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Sexual Violence

Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization, National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011

This report examines sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization using National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) data from 2011. The report describes the overall prevalence of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization; racial/ethnic variation in prevalence; how types of perpetrators vary by violence type; and the age at which victimization typically begins. For intimate partner violence, the report also examines a range of negative impacts experienced as a result of victimization, including the need for services.

Assessing Our Capacity for Serving Male Survivors of Sexual Violence

Sexual assault advocates and rape crisis centers can use this self-assessment tool to reflect on your current work serving men who have had unwanted sexual experiences. The tool offers reflection questions related to individual and organizational capacity to serve male survivors. This resource is part of Working with Male Survivors of Sexual Violence.

A Health Equity Approach to Preventing Sexual Violence

Sexual harassment, abuse, and assault can have short- and long-term physical, emotional, and psychological effects on a person’s well-being and impact an entire community, from the culture and connections between people to the economic toll. Preventing sexual violence means we all must address deep-rooted abuses of power that contribute to inequities in health, safety, and well-being.

How We Talk About Working with Male Survivors of Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Abuse

How we talk about sexual violence matters. Whether you’re describing your center’s services to a friend, talking with a classroom of college students about preventing sexual harassment, or writing your agency’s newsletter, the words you use have an impact on how audiences understand those topics. They also have an impact on who sees themselves as eligible for your center’s services.

Creating Partnerships in Your Local Communities to Support Male Survivors

Creating Partnerships in Your Local Communities to Support Male Survivors

Emily Bigger Mon, 06/07/2021