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Campus Sexual Assault: Suggested Policies and Procedures Jerika Heinze Mon, 02/22/2021 - 16:37

The statement that follows was approved in October 2012 by the Association’s Committee on Women in the Academic Profession and its Subcommittee on Sexual Assault on Campus. It was adopted by the American Association of University Professor’s Council in November 2012.  Read it Here

Key Findings from "Comprehensive Sexuality Education as a Primary Prevention Strategy for Sexual Violence Perpetration"

"Comprehensive Sexuality Education as a Primary Prevention Strategy for Sexual Violence Perpetration" explains the link between school-based sex education programs and sexual violence prevention, and how sex education can become an important strategy in preventing harm.

SART Toolkit Section 6.11

Section 6: Victim-Centered Approaches

Chad Sniffen Wed, 08/08/2018 - 10:23
Greek Life Postcard

Greek Life Postcard ImageThe Greek Life Postcard is a resource created for the 2017 Sexual Assault Awareness Month Campaign. The postcard contains information about how to create a healthy campus environment.

Emily Bigger Tue, 04/03/2018 - 09:20

The Resource Spring/Summer 2017

The Spring/Summer 2017 edition of The Resource includes the following stories:

  • Rutgers University's campus climate assessment process
  • The new multimedia campaign #LoveWITHAccountability for child incest and sexual abuse survivors of African descent
  • The uSafeNH app that provides information about services and support for survivors in New Hampshire
  • The basics of evaluating prevention work through social media from the Michigan Public Health Institute
  • The Raliance media summit and RALLYs awards

Also included is a look at RESTORE Sexual Assault Service's prevention work in New York, a spotlight on Iowa's service transition, and four resources from the library that might interest you.

Sexual Violence on Campus: Strategies for Prevention

As part of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, the CDC was tasked with identifying promising practices to prevent sexual violence on college and university campuses. In collaboration with the Department of Justice’s Office of Violence against Women, Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART) Office, and the Department of Education this tool offers an overview of how to approach sexual violence prevention on college campuses with real-world examples from the field.

Best Practices Guides for Virginia Campuses Addressing Gender-Based Violence

As Virginia’s leading voice on sexual and domestic violence, the Virginia Sexual & Domestic Violence Action Alliance believes all college students have the right to learn and live in an educational environment where they are safe and  treated equally. This is the overarching spirit of Title IX, the Clery Act, and Virginia campus safety legislation. The presence of sexual violence, dating/domestic violence, stalking, and other gender-based violence threatens this right. We also know that institutional and societal oppressions compound the negative effects of violence on students of color and other historically marginalized groups. We have heard from Virginia’s colleges and universities that you/they are hungry for concrete guidelines and examples of promising and best practices in Virginia and nationwide; to respond to this gap in resources, we researched and wrote a set of best practices guides for Virginia’s college and university campuses.

What makes these guides different from the other best practices guides for campuses?

The Safety and Justice for All guides outline best-practice recommendations to help campus professionals move beyond regulatory compliance and to institute trauma-informed and racial justice oriented prevention and responses to gender-based violence.

Recommendations are based on specific roles on campus

Key recommendations included in the guides are organized into six groups:

  • administrators;
  • advocates (both on- and off-campus);
  • faculty and other instructional employees;
  • Title IX coordinators and campus disciplinary professionals;
  • campus law enforcement and security officers; and
  • prevention specialists.

We created an edition specifically for Community Colleges

Due to the unique context of Virginia’s Community Colleges, we created a separate guide for those institutions. The structure and framework for the Community College guide are the same; several recommendations in this guide were adapted to address Community College specific concerns and utilize Community College examples.

Virginia’s colleges, universities, and community colleges are doing excellent work to respond to and prevent gender-based violence. These guides feature concrete examples of ways that institutions and organizations have implemented these recommendations, with the majority of the examples coming from Virginia institutions.

Chad Sniffen Thu, 10/13/2016 - 18:07