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Research Briefs

Key Findings of the Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency charged with enforcing federal labor laws that prohibit workplace discrimination, released findings from a year-long...

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Key FINDINGS on Sexual Violence from the “Global status report on violence prevention 2014”

This research translation provides a summary of key findings on sexual violence as a component of interpersonal violence that is the wider focus of the Global Status Report on Violence Prevention 2014. People working to end sexual violence can use these findings to inform data collection, prevention planning and evaluation, policy advocacy, and community partnerships.

Sally Laskey Wed, 07/06/2016 - 13:48
Key Findings from Sexual Violence Victimization and Associations with Health in a Community Sample of African American Women

African American women sitting on sidewalk with arms resting on kneesBasile, Smith, Fowler, Walters, and Hamburger (2016) offer a window into the lived experiences of African American women in Sexual violence victimization and associations with health in a community sample of African American women. This research translation summarizes the article’s key findings to help support sexual violence prevention and response strategies with Black and African American communities.

Sally Laskey Thu, 02/04/2016 - 16:28

Children’s Exposure to Violence, Crime, and Abuse: An Update

This bulletin discusses the second National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV II), which was conducted in 2011 as a follow up to the original NatSCEV I survey.

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Issue 22: What's missing from the news on sexual violence? An analysis of coverage, 2011-2013

This publication explores how sexual violence is portrayed in the news and considers the implications of these portrayals for prevention advocates and journalists interested in discussing not just the details of sexual violence, but also how to end it. The findings lay the foundation for ongoing work to define more effective messages about sexual violence that can support prevention policies.

This work is part of a multi-year collaboration between the National Sexual Violence Resource Center and Berkeley Media Studies Group.

Sally Laskey Tue, 09/01/2015 - 23:26

Key Findings: Rethinking Serial Perpetration

The serial perpetration hypothesis — which suggests that a small number of men perpetrate the vast majority of rapes, and that these men perpetrate multiple rapes over time — has played an important role in the field of rape prevention as a model of sexual violence, especially raising awareness of rapists who have not been identified by the criminal justice system. A 2015 study published in JAMA Pediatrics, A Trajectory Analysis of the Campus Serial Rapist Assumption, raises questions about the serial perpetrator hypothesis.

Although it is clear that a subset of perpetrators do commit multiple acts of rape over time, the research suggests that most perpetrators do not chronically offend over time. Instead, perpetrators are much more heterogeneous in terms of their risk factors, methods of coercion, and pattern of offending over time.

 

Principales hallazgos del estudio ‘La victimización mediante violencia sexual y sus asociaciones con la salud en una muestra comunitaria de mujeres hispanas’

Esta traducción resume los principales hallazgos del estudio “La victimización de Violencia Sexual y de las asociaciones de la salud en una muestra de la comunidad de las mujeres hispanas,” realizado por K. C. Basile, S.G. Smith, M.L. Walters, D.N. Fowler, K. Hawk y M.E. Hamburger. Los hallazgos del estudio se basan en nuestra comprensión de los efectos de la violencia sexual en mujeres latinas y pueden orientar nuestras estrategias tanto de prevención de la violencia sexual como de respuesta a ésta.

En inglés.

The Developing Brain: Implications for Youth Programs

To contribute to the dissemination of new brain research as it applies to those
serving children and youth, Child Trends invited Jane Roskams, Ph.D., a leading
neuroscientist and executive director of strategy and alliances at the Allen
Institute for Brain Science, to speak. Dr Roskams is a long-standing researcher
in the field of brain repair and epigenetics. She revealed new developments
in our understanding of how the brain grows and learns, and how it adapts
to its environment and trauma. Following her presentation, Dr. Kristin Moore,
Child Trends’ senior scholar and past president, moderated a discussion on the
practical implications of shifting views on brain development and resiliency. The
discussion aimed to inform programs and policies that affect young people,
particularly at-risk children. It featured two repondents: Daniel Cardinali,
President of Communities In Schools, the nation's largest drop-out prevention
program; and Dianna Walters of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative.
This research brief summarizes their presentations.