This research report discusses the findings of a study conducted largely in a border town in Mexico.  The researcher conducted in-depth interviews with individuals directly engaged in the sex trade.  According to the report, previous information on human trafficking relied heavily on information provided by agencies responding to it, including advocacy groups and law enforcement, but little direct research has been conducted.  This study sought to determine the extent to which coercion and manipulation were employed and how these operations were organized.

This research report discusses the outcomes of a study conducted to understand the help-seeking patterns of behavior among teens who experienced sexual assault and reported it.  The study found patterns in reporting, including reports that were voluntary, reports that were involuntary, and reports prompted by the circumstances of the assault.  The research suggests that teens who made voluntary reports were more likely to stay enaged in the legal system.

This research report discusses two programs developed by SAGE.  The LIFESKILLS program works with youth considered to be at risk for sexual exploitation.  The GRACE program works with adults who have been arrested for prostitution.  This research used a four-part participatory evaluation model, and findings suggest that involvement with these programs reduces contact with the criminal justice system.  The researchers also made recommendations for program improvement.

This NIJ special report outlines the issue of untested sexual assault kits that remain in law enforcement custody and evidence rooms and the impact that these kits have on communities and sexual assault response.  The report addresses victim notification and protocol when a kit is sent for testing and appropriate follow up.

Read this special report.

This report summarizes the information gathered by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) via a web-based survey regarding how local, state, territory and tribal communities have developed Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs). The survey is a follow-up to the national needs assessment conducted in 2005 by NSVRC.

This white paper discusses the sexuality and reproductive health of youth in the digital age.  According to the report, youth, ages 13-24, use technology as a means of exploring health related issues and well-being.  It include technology usage patterns and practical recommendations for working with youth to increase sexual health and literacy.

This report discusses research and knowledge on sexual abusers and sex offenders, including the history of public knowledge around child sexual abuse.  It includes information on preventing child sexual abuse through evidence-based and community informed sex offender policy. 

See the report online.

This publication is provided as a starting point for professional organizations and educational institutions to prepare their helping professionals, including doctors, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and beyond, to develop the skills and competencies needed to meet the needs of individuals who may have experienced abuse and violence.

This report discusses the value and benefits of rethinking violence prevention.  It suggests an approach that identifies and deconstructs root causes of violence.  Of particular interest in this report is the discussion of the predictability of violence on a community or population wide level.

View the full report.

This technical research report explores the prevalence, context, response, reactions and reporting of various forms of sexual violence on historically black college and university campuses.  This research was conducted in an effort to close current gaps in the literature in this topic area.

Read the full technical report and summary.

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