This report discusses a gender transformative approach to involving boys and men in preventing violence against women. It includes primary reasons for engaging men and boys, research on positive messaging, and examples of initiatives that can be used to increase involvement.

This report documents the interactions and trends through the National Human Trafficking Resource Center over the course of five years. It provides information on top trends in trafficking cases, gender breakdowns for trafficking victims, and the incidence of sex trafficking and labor trafficking referenced in hotline calls.

This report discusses the process of obtaining VA disability benefits for the enduring mental health effects of military sexual trauma (MST) and the challenges and discrimination faced by veterans. The report was developed by the Service Women's Action Network (SWAN) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) with assistance by the Yale Law School Veterans Legal Services Clinic.

This paper discusses joint approaches in intimate partner violence and sexual violenceprimary prevention. Advocates can learn about strategies for advancing both issues, working with funders and state coalitions, and how to support those implementing dual issue strategies.

View this paper.

This report is produced by Department of Defense and various Service branches to help address the crime of sexual assault within the Military. The data provided in such reports serve as the foundation and catalyst for future sexual assault prevention, training, victim care and accountability goals. It is available in 2 parts for download.

View Volume I

View Volume II

Or, you can view earlier reports.

This report presents the results on issues related to sexual assault from the 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members (WGRA 2012). The data provided in this survey describes the prevalence and incidence of sexual assault within the military.

View reports from earlier surveys.

The annual report provides data and analysis on reported cases of sexual harassment and violence involving Academy personnel between .  It also outlines progress made in prevention and response activities.
 
Read previous annual reports
.
 

The report, Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence, represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women -- both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector's capacity to respond to violence against women.

View the infographic.

See the full report.

 

The focus of this policy paper is civil commitment programs in the United States. The use of civil commitment for sexual offenders has generated considerable debate in legal and clinical professions, and it continues to be debated even among professionals who work with and conduct research on sexual offenders.

 The Office for Victims of Crime is pleased to announce the release of the Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report, the first comprehensive assessment of the victim assistance field in nearly 15 years. The Vision 21 initiative gave participants the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of service providers, advocates, criminal justice professionals, allied practitioners, and policymakers to address crime victim issues through a lens broader than their everyday work. The result of this collective examination, the report seeks to permanently transform the way crime victims are treated in this country. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report discusses the following:

  • Major challenges to the integration of research into victim services.
  • The tremendous need for crime victims to have access to legal assistance to address the wide range of legal issues that can arise following victimization.
  • The impact of advances in technology, globalization, and changing demographics on the victim assistance field.
  • The capacity for serving victims in the 21st century and some of the infrastructure issues that must be overcome to reach that capacity.

Furthermore, the final report outlines recommendations for beginning the transformative change, which fall into the following four broad categories:

  • Conducting continuous rather than episodic strategic planning in the victim assistance field to effect real change in research, policy, programming, and capacity building.
  • Supporting research to build a body of evidence-based knowledge and generate, collect, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data on victimization, emerging victimization trends, services and behaviors, and victims’ rights enforcement efforts.
  • Ensuring the statutory, policy, and programmatic flexibility to address enduring and emerging crime victim issues.
  • Building and institutionalizing capacity through an infusion of technology, training, and innovation to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the demands of the 21st century.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Reports