NSVRC and OAESV recently released a statement to follow up on the findings in the Steubenville case. “Turn off the victim blaming. Turn on support for survivors.” discusses some of the negative media feedback that has surrounded the case. I kind of feel like that title alone is all you really need to get from this post today. Why are we still talking about victim-blaming? The message must not be clear yet.

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This week the Talk early, talk often series continues on the SAAM Blog with a guest post from author and expert Dr. Janet Rosenzweig.

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This week the Talk early, talk often series continues on the SAAM blog with a guest post from preventionist Mo Lewis. This week's topic of talking with youth is especially timely in the aftermath of the Steubbenville rape trial verdict, in which two teen football players were found guilty of rape. It's important to remember that youth have incredible potential to advocate for social change.

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This week the Preventionista features a guest blog post by Jennifer Benner, NSVRC Resource Development Specialist. She discusses the recent case in Steubenville and tools for engaging bystanders in sexual violence prevention.

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As we watch the trial happenings in Steubenville, Ohio this week, I’m stuck on the role that social media played in this case.

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Picture this: A high school party, lots of alcohol, star football players, and a young, unconscious girl.  A recipe for disaster, some might say.  

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While I kind of doubt that anyone really noticed, I have had a long internal, guilty struggle over not writing this blog post.

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This week the Talk early, talk often series continues on the SAAM Blog with a guest post from Annie Gebhardt, MPH, Training Specialist at NSVRC.

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Free-womanYesterday was a day of crappy stories. Maybe you’ve had a day like that before. It’s the kind of day when everywhere you go, someone tells you about another yucky thing that they’ve experienced. It’s not always experiences of violence, sometimes its experiences of feeling belittled, disregarded, or shamed.

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Talk early, talk often is a big phrase this year for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. An idea born in a workgroup meeting last June is now the call to action of our campaign. We are asking adults to play a role in supporting healthy children by breaking through silence and opening up communication. Talking early, talking often is also how we want to approach sharing the SAAM campaign.

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