Working Towards a Stronger Future

We take the month of October to remember those who have suffered and those who continue to suffer from a very real and very cruel form of violence, domestic violence. I wish we lived in a world where there was no need for resources pertaining to any form of violence or abuse. But for now, resources like these are critical to the work we're all doing to prevent and ultimately end domestic and sexual violence. I hope the books, studies, and guides held in the NSVRC Library will be of use to those bravely working to end this and all forms of violence.

Runaway Wives and Rogue Feminists: The Origins of the Women's Shelter Movement in Canada by Margo Goodhand

The recently released Runaway Wives and Rogue Feminists: The Origins of the Women’s Shelter Movement in Canada by Margo Goodhand, highlights the subject of violence against women. In the 60s and 70s it was a widespread issue and yet women had few, if any options to escape their abusers. In 1973 with no money and very little public support, five groups of Canadian women quietly opened Canada’s first battered women’s shelter. Today there are over 600. Margo Goodhand tracks down the original feminists whose work created an underground railway for women and children. These women brought about changes in government, schools, courts, and law enforcement. Forty years later, these original women reflect on how Canada is now losing its ground in the battle for women’s rights.

Serving-Male Identified Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence by Eric Stiles, Ivonne Ortiz, and Casey Keene

Serving-Male Identified Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence by Eric Stiles, Ivonne Ortiz, and Casey Keene is a guide that supports advocates seeking to build capacity to recognize and respond to survivors across the gender spectrum, in a way that helps folks understand the root causes of violence and oppression. The guide also offers guidance for responding to the needs of male-identified victims. The guide also provides tools for outreach to males, gender inclusive service provision, building collaboration, and enhancing organizational policies. The guide is meant to be a resource for enhancing dialogue and supporting inclusive services for all victims and survivors seeking safety and healing. It can also be accessed through VAWnet.

Everyday Magic: 16 Ways Adults Can Support Children Exposed to Violence and Trauma by Emily Bowen

Studies suggest that by age 17, over one-third of children in the United States have been exposed to domestic violence. Everyday Magic: 16 Ways Adults Can Support Children Exposed to Violence and Trauma offers ways adults can support children exposed to violence and trauma, in order to help them heal and grow. The recommendations provided in the policy brief are for advocates, educators, and health care providers. The document can also be found through Futures Without Violence.

Moving Foward

These are just a small number of the wonderful resources the NSVRC Library has to offer. I can’t encourage everyone enough to check out the collection. As I mentioned, I wish we didn't have a need for these resources to exist and hopefully one day that will be the case. For now we have many wonderful individuals working to create a world free from violence and working to help others. We recognize this month as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, but my hope is that we don’t forget those who have, are, and may suffer from this form of violence in the future. We cannot stop working or lose hope in creating a better future.

As always, I wish you all a wonderful day and happy reading!

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