Perspectives of a Preventionista

By Jen Grove


Jen is the Prevention Outreach Coordinator at the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC).

Blog Description: Connecting readers with innovative sexual violence prevention programs and resources.

 

In September 2016, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault released guidance for school districts on creating and sustaining a sexual misconduct policy.  This guidance includes a recommendation around the inclusion of prevention and education programming in the school district.  That’s music to this preventionista’s ears!  

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This post is by Karla Vierthaler, Advocacy and Resources Director for the NSVRC.

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This is a blog post from Karla Vierthaler, Advocacy and Resources Director at NSVRC. 

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Image of Cover PageBy Megan Thomas, NSVRC Communications Specialist

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This blog post was originally published on the American Evaluation Association’s tip-a-day blog on January 16, 2016.  It is being republished here with permission.

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Reblogged from the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

{This post originally appeared on the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault website, and was written by David Lee.  It is reprinted with permission.  See the original post.)

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Today's guest  post is written by Michael Crawford, fellow blogger and Communications Assistant with the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape.

Leaves and temperatures are down, candy prices are up: it must be time to trick or treat!

As a parent, there are lots of things to worry about: tripping hazards, getting caught in the rain or (please, heavens, no) candy getting stuck in hair. But there’s one “trick” that probably won’t rear its head: the bogeyman.

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A few years ago, I had the opportunity to attend the Build Peace conference held at MIT in Cambridge, MA.  I was curious about one of the items on the agenda – Ignite Talks.  They were described as

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This year, NSVRC celebrated its 15th anniversary.  I often wonder what the staff back in 2000 envisioned as they looked to the future of the organization.  I came on board in 2005, when the shift to primary prevention of sexual violence was a “new” thing, and I spent much of my first few month

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