The Bureau of Justice Statistics special report Rape and Sexual Assault Victimization Among College-Age Females, 1995–2013 released in December, 2014 uses the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to compare the rape and sexual assault victimization from 1995 to 2013 of female college students (enrolled in a college, university, trade school or vocational school) and female nonstudents. Read our highlights.

This publication is designed to promote consistency in the use of terminology and data collection across organizations that work to prevent sexual violence. The updated document provides more detail on the various definitions of “sexual violence” and by addressing how technology is used to perpetrate unwanted sexual experiences. Learn more and download.

This guide discusses the 2014 research article "A systematic review of primary prevention strategies for sexual violence perpetration" by Sarah DeGue et al. It summarizes the methods and discusses key findings of the systematic review. It also proposes ways preventionists can use this research to identify promising prevention strategies, strengthen and evaluate their current efforts, and advocate with funders, policymakers, researchers, and community partners. 

This brief shares research on connections between different forms of violence and describes how these connections affect communities. The purpose is to help promote collaboration for more effective prevention. 

Learn more and download

Stop Street Harassment released this national report discussing research into the prevalence and experience of street harassment by both women and men. The majority of women experience street harassment. Many men who experience street harassment in the form of homophobic or transphobic slurs.

Access the Full Report, Executive Summary, and Press Release.

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

Read full report.

Download June 12, 2014 Webinar Powerpoint Slides

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