This report examines sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization using National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) data from 2011. The report describes the overall prevalence of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization; racial/ethnic variation in prevalence; how types of perpetrators vary by violence type; and the age at which victimization typically begins. For intimate partner violence, the report also examines a range of negative impacts experienced as a result of victimization, including the need for services.

This 2011 data finds that in the United States, an estimated 19.3% of women and 1.7% of men have been raped during their lifetimes; an estimated 1.6% of women reported that they were raped in the 12 months preceding the survey. The case count for men reporting rape in the preceding 12 months was too small to produce a statistically reliable prevalence estimate. An estimated 43.9% of women and 23.4% of men experienced other forms of sexual violence during their lifetimes, including being made to penetrate, sexual coercion, unwanted sexual contact, and noncontact unwanted sexual experiences. The percentages of women and men who experienced these other forms of sexual violence victimization in the 12 months preceding the survey were an estimated 5.5% and 5.1%, respectively.

Read more information about the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

 

 

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) infographic

This Applied Research paper examines whether organizational affiliation and structure affect the quantity and quality of sexual assault services. The paper offers recommendations for future research evaluating the effectiveness of rape crisis centers.

The Effectiveness of Sexual Assault Services in Multi-Service Agencies

This systematic review examined 140 outcome evaluations of primary prevention strategies for sexual violence perpetration. The review had two goals: 1) to describe and assess the breadth, quality, and evolution of evaluation research in this area; and 2) to summarize the best available research evidence for sexual violence prevention practitioners by categorizing programs with regard to their evidence of effectiveness on sexual violence behavioral outcomes in a rigorous evaluation. It found two primary prevention programs and a policy initiative with strong evidence of effectiveness for reducing rates of sexually violent behavior:

  • Safe Dates
  • Shifting Boundaries, building-level intervention; and
  • The 1994 U.S. Violence Against Women Act.
  • Other approaches with a focus on bystander training and healthy relationships are also promising

Read NSVRC Key Findings for preventionists.

 

 

This document, written by Hallie Martynuik, provides infomation on steps to created an institution based SART as well as lessons learned.

 

This study examined the structure and functioning of U.S. SARTs, patterns of SART implementation and how these patterns relate to SARTs perceived effectiveness at improving victim and legal outcomes.

In the January 2014 edition of the Reshape newsletter, Eric Stiles discusses the practice of creating sensitive and informed spaces for men and boys accessing services at sexual assault programs. Using trauma-informed strategies and the practice of meeting survivors where they are at, he promotes gender inclusive spaces and programming.

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In the January 2014 edition of the Reshape newsletter, Michelle Dixon-Wall discusses the challenges of working within a gendered framework at an anti-violence organization. She discusses barriers that men and boys may have to accessing sexual assault services and programs based on some basic structural practices.

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In the January 2014 edition of the Reshape newsletter, Emiliano Diaz de Leon discusses how state coalitions can strategically do outreach to men and boys and increase the capacity of local centers to do the same. He discusses technical assistance approaches, capacity building education ideas, and strategies for raising awareness.

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This discussion paper explores the use of evidence-based prevention programs and issues with research-translation in these programs. The goal is to create effective community-based programs that can be expanded to use within other communities.

This Applied Research paper reviews both international and U.S.-based policy efforts to promote sexual abuse prevention and offers considerations for policy development in communities and organizations.

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