The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

See only NSVRC publications

Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

We invite you to send additional materials for our resource collection to resources@nsvrc.org.

This document has been formatted so that families, community groups, and schools can use each section as a separate handout or use them all together as one complete document. Prevention tips and resources are provided to help children and youth of different ages or stages of development. The document is organized into four sections: Background Information; The “Basics” of Sexual Violence; Types of Sexual Violence;  and Who Can Help: Websites and Resources for Families.
 
Preventing Child and Youth Sexual Harassment, Abuse, and Assault: A Resource for Iowa Families

This resource provides assistance to higher education staff and direct service programs who are interested in providing comprehensive responses to dating abuse on college campuses.

Organizing College Campuses Against Dating Abuse

The intent of this project was to conduct a survey to assess how or whether organizational structure affects the provision or reporting of sexual assault services in both single program and combined sexual and domestic violence programs.
Organization of Sexual Assault Programs

This article summarizes current research on online sexual victimization and compares it to media accounts. The finding in the article reveal that contrary to stereotype, most internet sex offenders are not adults who target young children by posing as another youth, luring children to meetings, and then abducting or forcibly raping them. Rather, most online sex offenders are young adults who target teens and seduce victims into sexual relationships. They take time to develop the trust and confidence of victims, so that the youth see these relationships as romances or sexual adventures. They recommend that prevention efforts with adolescents be targeted, age-appropriate, and include frank discussions of sexuality and the hazards of relationships with older people.
 
Online “Predators” and Their Victims: Myths, Realities, and Implications for Prevention and Treatment

This protocol provides guidelines to establish comprehensive, standardized, non-judgmental, equitable treatment of pediatric victims of sexual abuse.
 Ohio Pediatric Sexual Abuse Protocol

This booklet introduces a new approach to helping victims of sexual violence. This approach, called the victim-centered “Sex Offender Containment Model”, may be a significant change in the way some of you do your advocacy work. It uses a multidisciplinary team approach to working with probation and parole, law enforcement, treatment providers, and others on a Sex Offender Containment Team.

Through this report, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) shares its experience inproviding medical care, counselling and other forms of support to thousandsof victims of sexual violence in many countries around the world. The report is partly born out of outrage about the inexcusable acts that these people have been subjected to and the damage inflicted upon their lives. It demonstrates why it is imperative to make immediate care available, and truly accessible, for those who have been sexually assaulted. MSF hopes that this report will inform and inspire health officials, aid workers and others who should be involved in providing such support.Shattered Lives: Immediate Medical Care Vital for Sexual Violence Victims 

This article is the second part of the new Allicance journal, Revolution. In this part of the journal, Melissa A. DeDomenico-Payne shares her own perspective and experiences within working at sexual assault programs, domestic violence programs and dual programs. The purpose of the article is to be able to make others in the field aware of some of the similarities and differences that exist among stand-alone and dual programs.

 

My Perspective: The Subtle Differences Between...a Stand-Alone Domestic Violence (DV) Program, a Stand-Alone Sexual Assault (SA) Program, and a Dual (DV & SA) Program

This is the March 2005 inaugural issue of the quarterly newsletter from the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance. This publication focuses on providing information to enhance primary sexual violence prevention work in communities.
Moving Upstream: Virginia’s Newsletter for the Primary Prevention of Sexual Violence

This report identifies criteria for building a trauma-informed mental health service system, summarizes the evolution of trauma-informed and trauma-specific services in state mental health systems, and describes a range of trauma-based service models and approaches implemented by increasing numbers of state  systems and localities across the country.

 

Models for Developing Trauma-Informed Behavioral Health Systems and Trauma-Specific Services

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