The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

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Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

We invite you to send additional materials for our resource collection to resources@nsvrc.org.

This series of four guides was originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking. The guides have since been adapted for use by other grantees and organizations that provide programs for victims of any type of crime.

The guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

 

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.

If your program intends to conduct a needs assessment or program evaluation, you must be aware of federal regulations that protect the privacy and confidentiality of persons involved in research (i.e., human subjects). This guide provides basic information about these federal regulations and explains how they pertain to your needs assessment or program evaluation.

Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

The other three guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
 

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.

Use this guide to help you determine whether you have the resources and expertise within your initiative to plan and implement a needs assessment and program evaluation, or if it is best to hire a local evaluator to help you conduct these activities. This guide contains useful tips on what to consider in the decision making and selection processes of hiring a local evaluator. 

Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator

The other three guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.

This following guide will help you conduct a comprehensive needs assessment of your community, target populations, and the services available to them. It will also guide you in using the results of your needs assessment to further develop, refine, and implement your program.

Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment

The other three guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects
 

This guide is one of four guides originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking.
This following guide will help you:

    * Develop an evaluation plan for collecting data on performance measures.
    * Establish measureable goals and objectives.
    * Design and conduct the program evaluation to continuously assess your program’s progress in achieving its established goals and objectives.
    * Identify measures to reflect the impact of your program’s activities.
    * Use the results to refine and improve services.
Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation

The other three guides include: 
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

This special collection emphasizes collaborative and multi-level approaches to the prevention of and response to teen dating violence.  It provides general introductory information about teen dating violence.  Additionally, there are specific sections focusing on and for young people, parents and care takers, men and boys, teachers and school-based professionals, health care professionals, and domestic violence and sexual violence service providers. Documents related laws and legislation are also included. The special collection concludes with examples of national programs and lists national organizational resources.

This 20th annual World Report summarizes human rights conditions in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide. It reflects extensive investigative work undertaken in 2009 by Human Rights Watch staff, usually in close partnership with human rights activists in the country in question.

World Report 2010

 

Parents and other caregivers who view and discuss Raising Healthy Kids: Families Talk About Sexual Health will learn information and skills that help them communicate more effectively with their children.

RAISING HEALTHY KIDS: Families Talk About Sexual Health, For Parents of Young Children

Violence and abuse occur in all age groups, at all socioeconomic levels, and throughout all of society’s structure. This paper reviews a sampling of the literature that supports the contention that violence and abuse lead to a significant increase in health care utilization and costs. Includes a graph that illustrates the conditions and health risk behaviors that are known or suspected to have a correlation with lifetime exposure to abuse.

Hidden Costs in Health Care: The Economic Impact of Violence and Abuse

Presents data from the 2008-09 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 195 juvenile confinement facilities between June 2008 and April 2009, with a sample of over 9,000 adjudicated youth. The report provides national-level and facility-level estimates of sexual victimization by type of activity, including youth-on-youth sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also includes an analysis of the experience of sexual victimization, characteristics of youth most at risk to victimization, where the incidents occur, time of day, characteristics of perpetrators, and nature of the injuries. Finally, it includes estimates of the sampling error for selected measures of sexual victimization and summary characteristics of victims and incidents.

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09

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