The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

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Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

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Violence and abuse occur in all age groups, at all socioeconomic levels, and throughout all of society’s structure. This paper reviews a sampling of the literature that supports the contention that violence and abuse lead to a significant increase in health care utilization and costs. Includes a graph that illustrates the conditions and health risk behaviors that are known or suspected to have a correlation with lifetime exposure to abuse.

Hidden Costs in Health Care: The Economic Impact of Violence and Abuse

Presents data from the 2008-09 National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC), conducted in 195 juvenile confinement facilities between June 2008 and April 2009, with a sample of over 9,000 adjudicated youth. The report provides national-level and facility-level estimates of sexual victimization by type of activity, including youth-on-youth sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and level of coercion. It also includes an analysis of the experience of sexual victimization, characteristics of youth most at risk to victimization, where the incidents occur, time of day, characteristics of perpetrators, and nature of the injuries. Finally, it includes estimates of the sampling error for selected measures of sexual victimization and summary characteristics of victims and incidents.

Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2008-09

 This report provides an overview the National SANE Coordinator Symposium Project in order to increase SANE program development. First National SANE Coordinator Symposium: Final Report and Recommendations  

A guide for victim service providers, volunteers, and other concerned community members on how to initiate and run a stalking support group in their agency or community. The guide includes information about designing a support group for stalking victims, recommendations for group membership, tips for facilitators, a sample curriculum, and much more.How to Start and Facilitate a Support Group for Victims of Stalking

An interview with Deirdre Keys, Coordinator of the Stalking Response Program at the Battered Woman’s Legal Advocacy Project, a state-wide agency supporting advocacy in Minnesota, and formally of Cornerstone Advocacy Service, Bloomington, Minnesota, highlighting promising responses to stalking.Practitioner Perspectives: Highlighting Promising Responses to Stalking Across the United States

Research on juvenile sex offenders goes back more than half a century; however, little information about these young offenders and their offenses exists. This Bulletin draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide population-based epidemiological information on juvenile sex offending.

It is OJJDP’s hope that the findings reported in this Bulletin and their implications will help inform the policy and practice of those committed to addressing the sexual victimization of youth and strengthening its preven-tion and deterrence—considerations that are critical to success.

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors
 
 

The following UNFPA report indicates women, especially poor women living in developing countries, are more susceptible to the negative effects of climate change. The report also identified that increased contraceptive access, increased participation of women in policymaking, and increased civil rights could help alleviate the affects of climate change, according to the Voice of America.
Facing a Changing World: Women, Population and Climate

Juveniles commit a significant portion of the sex offenses that occur in the United States each year. They account for up to one-fifth of rapes and one-half of all cases of child molestation committed annually. In a 2000 study, data collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 23 percent of sexual assault offenders were under the age of 18. Boys ages 13 to 17 perpetrate most of the sexual crimes committed by juveniles, but recent studies have shown that girls under age 18 and children under age 13 have also committed sexual offenses. Across the country, police officials partnering with other stakeholders have implemented successful programs to manage offenders and prevent future sexual offending by juveniles. This brief describes trends observed in the field and the strategies employed by two law enforcement agencies to manage juvenile sex offenders in their communities.
Juvenile Sex Offenders: Managing and Preventing Future Offenses

The majority of teens have been involved in a romantic relationship. The following  brief, Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships, summarizes findings from focus groups that explored what teens themselves have to say about these relationships.  
 
Among the findings:- Teens view respect, trust, and love as essential to healthy relationships.- Teens have a clear understanding and expectation of what defines a healthy romantic relationship.- Teens' relationships typically fall short of their own standards of healthy romantic relationships.- Infidelity, relationship violence, and few role models contribute to teens' low expectations for healthy relationships. Telling It Like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships

Developed as part of a large research study on the work of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) in the criminal justice system, this toolkit is designed to assist SANE program staff in evaluating how their program impacts the reporting, investigation, and prosecution of sexual assault cases in their community.

Step-by-Step Practitioner Toolkit for Evaluating the Work of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Programs in the Criminal Justice System

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