The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

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Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

We invite you to send additional materials for our resource collection to resources@nsvrc.org.

Negative health outcomes of sexual assault afflict all sexes, stemming from both childhood and adult sexual traumas. This research brief can help stakeholders, including sexual assault advocates and health care providers, understand the ways that sexual victimization can trigger or exacerbate physical and mental health conditions.

The purpose of this research briefBrief Cover is to review research on the relationship between sexual violence and trafficking (especially, but not limited to, sex trafficking) and shed light on gaps in existing research. The documents reviewed in this brief discuss trafficking, the frequency of sexual violence against trafficking victims, health concerns of victims, and strategies for outreach to victims.

This research brief explores the Brief Coverprevalence of sexual violence against individuals and communities who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ). Studies between 2006 and 2011 are covered and examine sexual violence against victims who identify as LGBTQ in the form of hate or bias-motivated crimes, intimate partner violence, childhood sexual abuse, and adult sexual assault.

This resource is part of the Information Packet on Sexual Violence & Those Who Identify as LGBTQ.

This research brief, reviews articles that explore the connection between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and subsequent sexual victimization in adulthood. It demonstrates the significant link between childhood and adulthood sexual revictimization, as well as related health problems.

Housing & Sexual Violence Research Brief Cover with image of doorThis research brief explores the relationship between housing issues, homelessness, and sexual violence. The research reviewed indicates that residents of subsidized housing and people who are homeless experience disproportionate rates of sexual violence.

This brief is part of the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. This packet also includes: the National Survey of Advocates on Sexual Violence, Housing, and the Violence Against Women Act; an overview; a fact sheet; an online resource collection; a technical assistance bulletin; and an advocate's guide to housing and sexual violence.
 
 

 

The purpose of this research brief is to synthesize prior research on risk and preventative factors for child sexual abuse (CSA) perpetration, while highlighting special offender populations. Browse the rest of the Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Information Packet: overview, technical assistance bulletin, technical assistance guide on programs for adults, technical assistance guide for programs for children, resource list, annotated bibliography, research brief and online special collection.

This brief reviews research on risk and protective factors related to sexual violence in later life.
 
Browse all contents of The Sexual Violence in Later Life Information packet.  This packet was developed by Holly Ramsey-Klawsnik, Phd, in conjunction with the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. The packet includes a fact sheet, technical assistance bulletin, technical assistance guide, resource list, annotated bibliography, research brief and an online collection.

This Occasional Paper is entitled Beijing and Beyond: Putting Gender Economics at the Forefront, Fifteen Years After the World Conference on Women. This paper demonstrates that, notwithstanding some advances since the Beijing Conference and the adoption of CEDAW, the UN member States still have not fully implemented their commitments to gender equity as an essential condition for sustainable economic and social development. Also, the evolution of the gender statistical indicators, along with the narratives included in this publication, prove that that there is an evident gap between gender legislation and its implementation of actual policies.

Furthermore, the GEI uncovers a staggering wipe out of the economic gains made by women at the global level and the negative impact of the global financial crisis on them. These commentaries draw attention most specifically to the financial crisis as its effects are widespread and exacerbate already existing inequalities. They also highlight the gendered nature of the crisis and its effects on women and women-depending economies. Moreover, the articles point to concrete policies that which should be implemented to deal with the current crises.

Para ver el informe en Español haga click aqui.
Gender Equity Index 2009 (GEI)

Research on juvenile sex offenders goes back more than half a century; however, little information about these young offenders and their offenses exists. This Bulletin draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide population-based epidemiological information on juvenile sex offending.

It is OJJDP’s hope that the findings reported in this Bulletin and their implications will help inform the policy and practice of those committed to addressing the sexual victimization of youth and strengthening its preven-tion and deterrence—considerations that are critical to success.

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors
 
 

Juveniles commit a significant portion of the sex offenses that occur in the United States each year. They account for up to one-fifth of rapes and one-half of all cases of child molestation committed annually. In a 2000 study, data collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 23 percent of sexual assault offenders were under the age of 18. Boys ages 13 to 17 perpetrate most of the sexual crimes committed by juveniles, but recent studies have shown that girls under age 18 and children under age 13 have also committed sexual offenses. Across the country, police officials partnering with other stakeholders have implemented successful programs to manage offenders and prevent future sexual offending by juveniles. This brief describes trends observed in the field and the strategies employed by two law enforcement agencies to manage juvenile sex offenders in their communities.
Juvenile Sex Offenders: Managing and Preventing Future Offenses

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