The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

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This curriculum provides information about the medical forensic sexual assault examination, and explores some of the legal issues involved in expert testimony and evidence provided through a forensic exam. It addresses some of the limitations on the scope of SANE testimony, as well as limitations as to what the examination findings can actually prove. 

This bookletby the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault (TAASA) includes basic information about the period immediately after the victimization. For example, 'Who can help me?' 'Do I have to tell the police what happened to me?' and 'How will my family and my friends react?'. There are also lists of resources in Texas In Spanish. Ordering information (the PDF is free).

Este folleto por la Asociación de Tejas Contra el Asalto Sexual (en inglés, TAASA) incluye información básica sobre el periodo inmediatamente después de la victimización. Por ejemplo, ‘¿Quién me puede ayudar?’ ‘¿Tengo que dar parte a la policía de lo que me sucedio?’ y ‘¿Como reaccionaran mis familiares y mis amigos?’. También hay listas de recursos en Tejas. En inglés. Información para hacer un pedido (el PDF es gratis).

This document provides information on the laws and guidelines on forensic compliance and payment for sexual assault medical forensic exams in individual states or territories. Access the full report, or the summary to learn more.

Issue #13 of Strategies In Brief provides a review of research studies on the presence or absence of genital or anal injuries in cases of sexual assault. Absence of injury is relatively common, but this does not necessarily indicate that no assault occurred.

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