Many victim advocates have increasingly recognized the benefits of working more closely with sex offender treatment and management professionals, and those systems, in turn, are working to become more victim-centered in their approaches.  In 2012, the Center for Sex Offender Management (CSOM) was awarded an Office on Violence Against Women Technical Assistance grant to develop resources related to this type of collaboration.  CSOM partnered with the Resource Sharing Project, the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, and NSVRC, over the next few years to develop resources and trainings.  The first phase of this process involved surveying victim advocates, sex offender treatment providers, and management officers to identify the current level of cross-disciplinary collaboration occurring in communities.  All three groups, interestingly, indicated a strong desire for more collaboration with their local counterparts; however very little meaningful collaboration was actually occurring at the time.  The surveys further identified some of the common barriers being lack of understanding of one another’s roles and responsibilities; differing language and philosophies; and not knowing how to get started.  The four collaborative partners worked together to create resources and tools to begin to address some of these common barriers, and to facilitate stronger collaborations.

"Promoting Collaboration Between Victim Advocates and Sex Offender Management Professionals: A Resource Package" is the first tool produced by this collaboration.

These documents support the June 2016 online xCHANGE Forum: Exploring restorative justice and cultural relevance. This forum explores current research and best practices that involves cases of sexual violence and the culturally unique needs of our communities.

Offender Apology Package


Client Evaluation Package (Bend, Oregon)


How Restorative Is Your Agency Assessment


Sample Victim Impact Statement

 

View the entire archive of the xCHANGE forum

The serial perpetration hypothesis — which suggests that a small number of men perpetrate the vast majority of rapes, and that these men perpetrate multiple rapes over time — has played an important role in the field of rape prevention as a model of sexual violence, especially raising awareness of rapists who have not been identified by the criminal justice system. A 2015 study published in JAMA Pediatrics, A Trajectory Analysis of the Campus Serial Rapist Assumption, raises questions about the serial perpetrator hypothesis.

Although it is clear that a subset of perpetrators do commit multiple acts of rape over time, the research suggests that most perpetrators do not chronically offend over time. Instead, perpetrators are much more heterogeneous in terms of their risk factors, methods of coercion, and pattern of offending over time.

 

The Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA) is committed to promoting evidence-based practices and high quality research. Consistent with professional and scientific opinion in diverse fields, ATSA recognizes randomized clinical trials (RCTs) as the preferred method of controlling for bias in treatment outcome evaluations. ATSA promotes the use of RCT to distinguish between interventions that decrease the recidivism risk of sexual offenders and those programs that have no effect or are actually harmful.

Read the full statement.

This policy paper offers a discussion and recommendations for managing the housing needs of sex offenders.

This policy paper discusses public health prevention efforts to encourage a shift in focus from intervention and treatment following an assault to primary prevention -- the prevention of sexual abuse before it is perpetrated.

Read the full paper.

This policy paper offers recommendations for implementation of registration and notification based on existing research about the assessment and management of sex offenders.

This policy paper is an overview of the treatment and intervention with sex offenders and the need to develop strategies to eradicate sexual abuse and the risks those offenders pose to society.

This policy paper discusses implementing randomized clinical trials including the following six considerations; clear rationale for use of randomization, well-defined treatment and comparison intervention conditions, group equivalence, program evaluation/treatment outcome, participant attrition and data analysis.

This publication discusses reshaping sex offender public policy through a comprehensive approach and new collaborative models through cross-disciplinary professional partners; to craft new policies that prevent abuse before it is perpetrated and re-offenses.

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