These documents support the June 2016 online xCHANGE Forum: Exploring restorative justice and cultural relevance. This forum explores current research and best practices that involves cases of sexual violence and the culturally unique needs of our communities.

Offender Apology Package


Client Evaluation Package (Bend, Oregon)


How Restorative Is Your Agency Assessment


Sample Victim Impact Statement

 

View the entire archive of the xCHANGE forum

The serial perpetration hypothesis — which suggests that a small number of men perpetrate the vast majority of rapes, and that these men perpetrate multiple rapes over time — has played an important role in the field of rape prevention as a model of sexual violence, especially raising awareness of rapists who have not been identified by the criminal justice system. A 2015 study published in JAMA Pediatrics, A Trajectory Analysis of the Campus Serial Rapist Assumption, raises questions about the serial perpetrator hypothesis.

Although it is clear that a subset of perpetrators do commit multiple acts of rape over time, the research suggests that most perpetrators do not chronically offend over time. Instead, perpetrators are much more heterogeneous in terms of their risk factors, methods of coercion, and pattern of offending over time.

 

The Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA) is committed to promoting evidence-based practices and high quality research. Consistent with professional and scientific opinion in diverse fields, ATSA recognizes randomized clinical trials (RCTs) as the preferred method of controlling for bias in treatment outcome evaluations. ATSA promotes the use of RCT to distinguish between interventions that decrease the recidivism risk of sexual offenders and those programs that have no effect or are actually harmful.

Read the full statement.

This policy paper offers a discussion and recommendations for managing the housing needs of sex offenders.

This policy paper discusses public health prevention efforts to encourage a shift in focus from intervention and treatment following an assault to primary prevention -- the prevention of sexual abuse before it is perpetrated.

Read the full paper.

This policy paper offers recommendations for implementation of registration and notification based on existing research about the assessment and management of sex offenders.

This policy paper is an overview of the treatment and intervention with sex offenders and the need to develop strategies to eradicate sexual abuse and the risks those offenders pose to society.

This policy paper discusses implementing randomized clinical trials including the following six considerations; clear rationale for use of randomization, well-defined treatment and comparison intervention conditions, group equivalence, program evaluation/treatment outcome, participant attrition and data analysis.

This publication discusses reshaping sex offender public policy through a comprehensive approach and new collaborative models through cross-disciplinary professional partners; to craft new policies that prevent abuse before it is perpetrated and re-offenses.

The focus of this policy paper is civil commitment programs in the United States. The use of civil commitment for sexual offenders has generated considerable debate in legal and clinical professions, and it continues to be debated even among professionals who work with and conduct research on sexual offenders.

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