Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.


As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet presents information on people who commit sexual violence.


The full Media Packet offers 6 resources that answer common questions related to sexual violence.

The executive summary of a research project to determine the effectiveness of preventing sexual offenses after imposing a sex-offender registry requirement in South Carolina briefly discusses the findings.  According to the report, first time offenses were reduced, online registries appear to have no impact on recidivism, and failure to register did not predict recidivism.

This report discusses research and knowledge on sexual abusers and sex offenders, including the history of public knowledge around child sexual abuse.  It includes information on preventing child sexual abuse through evidence-based and community informed sex offender policy. 

See the report online.

Research on juvenile sex offenders goes back more than half a century; however, little information about these young offenders and their offenses exists. This Bulletin draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide population-based epidemiological information on juvenile sex offending.

It is OJJDP’s hope that the findings reported in this Bulletin and their implications will help inform the policy and practice of those committed to addressing the sexual victimization of youth and strengthening its preven-tion and deterrence—considerations that are critical to success.

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors

This booklet introduces a new approach to helping victims of sexual violence. This approach, called the victim-centered “Sex Offender Containment Model”, may be a significant change in the way some of you do your advocacy work. It uses a multidisciplinary team approach to working with probation and parole, law enforcement, treatment providers, and others on a Sex Offender Containment Team.


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