This publication discusses reshaping sex offender public policy through a comprehensive approach and new collaborative models through cross-disciplinary professional partners; to craft new policies that prevent abuse before it is perpetrated and re-offenses.

This report discusses research and knowledge on sexual abusers and sex offenders, including the history of public knowledge around child sexual abuse.  It includes information on preventing child sexual abuse through evidence-based and community informed sex offender policy. 

See the report online.

The goal of this document is to provide relevant information for reducing sexual reoffending by adolescents and promoting effective interventions that facilitate pro-social and law-abiding behaviors. This document is purposefully short in length, summarizes central findings from the research, and outlines some major areas for consideration when working with this population of youth and their families.

The focus of this policy paper is civil commitment programs in the United States. The use of civil commitment for sexual offenders has generated considerable debate in legal and clinical professions, and it continues to be debated even among professionals who work with and conduct research on sexual offenders.

The executive summary of a research project to determine the effectiveness of preventing sexual offenses after imposing a sex-offender registry requirement in South Carolina briefly discusses the findings.  According to the report, first time offenses were reduced, online registries appear to have no impact on recidivism, and failure to register did not predict recidivism.

Juveniles commit a significant portion of the sex offenses that occur in the United States each year. They account for up to one-fifth of rapes and one-half of all cases of child molestation committed annually. In a 2000 study, data collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 23 percent of sexual assault offenders were under the age of 18. Boys ages 13 to 17 perpetrate most of the sexual crimes committed by juveniles, but recent studies have shown that girls under age 18 and children under age 13 have also committed sexual offenses. Across the country, police officials partnering with other stakeholders have implemented successful programs to manage offenders and prevent future sexual offending by juveniles. This brief describes trends observed in the field and the strategies employed by two law enforcement agencies to manage juvenile sex offenders in their communities.
Juvenile Sex Offenders: Managing and Preventing Future Offenses

Research on juvenile sex offenders goes back more than half a century; however, little information about these young offenders and their offenses exists. This Bulletin draws on data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Incident-Based Reporting System to provide population-based epidemiological information on juvenile sex offending.

It is OJJDP’s hope that the findings reported in this Bulletin and their implications will help inform the policy and practice of those committed to addressing the sexual victimization of youth and strengthening its preven-tion and deterrence—considerations that are critical to success.

Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors
 
 

This is a report from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Forward: “The authors of Juveniles Who Have Sexually Offended have diligently mined the research literature to provide a comprehensive and annotated account of the characteristics of juveniles who commit sex offenses and their families, and the type of offenses they commit. A broad array of clinical assessment tools, including psychological testing, are described, and a thorough discussion of recidivism rates and issues is presented. The Report concludes with a review of treatment approaches and settings and a look at program assessment. Youth who have committed sex offenses both have developmental needs and pose unique risks related to their abusive behaviors. The information provided by the review of the professional literature presented in this Report should enable us to better address those needs and risks.
 
Juveniles Who Have Sexually Offended: A Review of the Professional Literature

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