Esta guía está diseñada para los Intercesores/as  de programas de agresion sexual que trabajan con los padres sin ofender y / o cuidadores de niños que han sufrido asalto sexual. Las sugerencias y estrategias están destinadas para su uso con los niños bajo la edad de 13 años.

En inglés

 

This toolkit provides resources and support to build language access as a core service for survivors with LEP. The tabs at the top link to:

  • A step-by-step process for developing your first written Language Access Plan, and a guide to critical conversations to enhance an existing Language Access Plan.
  • Tools to help you establish your program’s language access standards and make them part of your program’s day-to-day work, such as language skill assessments, interpreter code of ethics and confidentiality forms, and multilingual materials (I Speak cards, translated materials, etc.).
  • These are management tools your program may use regularly; and direct advocacy tools for use by and with survivors with LEP.
  • Descriptions and analysis of specific language access strategies such as language identification and interpreter services.
  • Support to help you advocate for language access services throughout the community: training curriculum and systems advocacy guidance.
  • Resources, such as federal law and guidance, sample plans, and promising practices to help you shape your efforts. These are informational resources you may need to build your own Language Access Plan and for systems advocacy.

 

These slides were created to support the June 2015 Online xCHANGE Forum: Sexual violence in the lives of African American Women.  This forum will explore current research on the sexual victimization of African American women and future needs for the field.

View the entire slideshow.

View slides by forum topic:

Historical Overview

National Studies

Risk Factors

Characteristics

Physical and Mental Health Consequences

Culturally Sensitive Treatment

View the entire archive of the xCHANGE Forum.

Spring/Summer 2015 The Resource cover imageThe Spring/Summer 2015 edition of The Resource shines a spotlight on campus sexual assault. Included in the special campus section are the following articles:

  • 'The Hunting Ground': An interview with filmmaker Amy Ziering reveals it wasn't difficult to find survivors of campus sexual violence who wanted to tell their stories for the documentary film. "The sad thing is, there are way too many survivors," Ziering said.
     
  • Director's Viewpoint: Karen Baker, Director of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, talks about a busy Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April 2015, the theme of which was "It's Time to Act: Safer Campuses, Brighter Futures. Prevent Sexual Violence."
     
  • Prevention preparedness: Are coalitions in the U.S. ready to lead primary prevention, campus-based efforts?
     
  • 'From compliance to commitment': The North Carolina Campus Consortium hosted its first-ever Campus Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence Peer Educator's Summit.
     
  • Sexual Assault Awareness Month: Photos from 30 busy days of activism.

Other topics covered in this issue include: effective social media advocacy, The Six Pillars for Prevention of child sexual abuse, the 2015 National Sexual Assault Conference in Los Angeles, and more.

Want to read about a topic that hasn't been covered? Send ideas to resources@nsvrc.org with the subject line "Resource Story Idea."

This guide is designed for sexual assault program advocates working with non-offending parents and/or caregivers of children who have experienced sexual assault. The suggestions and strategies are intended for use with children under the age of 13. In Spanish.

This report describes research on victim and professional perspectives on the delivery of victim notification procedures, implementation of new victim notification processes, victim engagement within the criminal justice system, and recommendations for improvements.

Victims and professionals made five recommendations.

  • Law enforcement should not assume that a victim does or does not want to be notified.
  • All victims should be given the opportunity to be notified, and the decision for notification should be a choice provided to all victims instead of something imposed on them by someone else.
  • Mechanisms for notification should be flexible and thoughtful and incorporate choices for victims.
  • Victims should have a choice in whether their case moves forward based on DNA testing.
  • Resources and support are imperative to the notification process.

Additional reports from this research project can be found at: www.houstonsakresearch.org.

The Sexual Assault Demonstration Initiative (SADI) Newsletter serves as a project brief to the field on the first national demonstration initiative designed to identify and disseminate information on promising practices for enhancing services to sexual violence survivors in dual and multi-service agencies. This edition provides information and tools related to organizational trauma and creating resilient organizations.
 

Read Summer 2013 Edition.

Read Winter 2014 Edition.

This issue brief discusses young men of color as a largely overlooked group of victims. It looks at both local and nationwide efforts to provide support and services.

The Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance offers these recommendations based on more than 30 years of work with students, campuses, community advocates and national leaders dedicated to building an effective response to sexual assault.

This flyer provides information about the NSVRC’s Lifespan Project which is a technical assistance initiative to provide advocates, medical providers, law enforcement, prosecutors, and others with resources and strategies to effectively respond to and support survivors of sexual violence. The Lifespan Project focuses on trauma-informed service delivery with a particular concern for populations who may fall through the cracks of our systems.

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