This is a report from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Forward: “The authors of Juveniles Who Have Sexually Offended have diligently mined the research literature to provide a comprehensive and annotated account of the characteristics of juveniles who commit sex offenses and their families, and the type of offenses they commit. A broad array of clinical assessment tools, including psychological testing, are described, and a thorough discussion of recidivism rates and issues is presented. The Report concludes with a review of treatment approaches and settings and a look at program assessment. Youth who have committed sex offenses both have developmental needs and pose unique risks related to their abusive behaviors. The information provided by the review of the professional literature presented in this Report should enable us to better address those needs and risks.
 
Juveniles Who Have Sexually Offended: A Review of the Professional Literature

This short fact sheet talks about how sexual abuse of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) inmates constitutes one of the most rampant and
ignored human rights violations in the U.S. today.
LGBTQ Detainees Chief Targets for Sexual Abuse in Detention

Did you know there’s a link between sexual violence and housing? Sexual violence can jeopardize a person’s housing. Lack of housing or inadequate shelter can increase the risk for sexual violence. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 10 percent of women and 8 percent men who experienced housing insecurity in the past year had a higher prevalence of intimate partner violence. This infographic explores the intersections between housing and sexual violence. For more information on this topic, download the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. (see references) Housing-infographic-cover

INFOGRAPHIC REFERENCES
Housing insecurity and intimate partner violence
Breiding, M. J., Chen J., & Black, M. C. (2014). Intimate partner violence in the United States — 2010. Retrieved from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/cdc_nisvs_ipv_report_2013_v17_...

Assaults in the home
Colombino, N., Mercado, C. C., & Jeglic, E. L. (2009). Situational aspects of sexual offending: Implications for residence restriction laws. Justice
Research and Policy, 11, 27-43. doi:10.3818/JRP.11.2009.27

Youth leaving home
Cray, A., Miller, K., & Durso, L. E. (2013). Seeking shelter: The experiences and unmet needs of LGBT homeless youth. Retrieved from the Center
for American Progress: http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/LGBTHomelessY...

Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania: http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

Victims relocating
Keeley, T. (2006). Landlord sexual assault and rape of tenants: Survey findings and advocacy approaches. Clearinghouse Review: Journal of
Poverty Law and Policy, 40 (7-8), 441-450.

Witnessing an assault
Kipke, M., Simon, T., Montgomery, S., Unger, J., & Iverson, E. (1997). Homeless youth and their exposure to and involvement in violence
while living on the streets. Journal of Adolescent Health, 20, 360-367. doi:10.1016/S1054-139X(97)00037-2

Victims of physical or sexual violence
Kushel, M. B., Evans, J. L., Perry, S., Robertson, M. J., & Moss, A.R. (2003). No door to lock: Victimization among homeless and
marginally housed persons. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163, 2492-2499. doi:10.1001/archinte.163.20.2492

Commercial sexual exploitation
Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania. http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

 

These fact sheets describe how violence affects other health problems and community concerns, such as chronic diseases, mental illness and poor learning. Children who are scared at school cannot focus on learning, for example, and people are less likely to be active if the local park isn't safe. These fact sheets were designed to persuade educators and those in health, public health and mental health that violence can undermine the work of all sectors, and that everyone should include preventing violence in their efforts. Backed by the latest research, these fact sheets make the case that preventing violence is a key aspect of any vibrant community, one where young people enjoy every opportunity to learn, thrive and excel.

This resource is designed to help public policy officials, health care professionals, and other pertinent professionals understand how rape in America is measured, what the numbers mean, and what the limitations are of existing research.
 
Making Sense of Rape in America: Where Do the Numbers Come From and What Do They Mean

This report details the results of a national telephone survey identifying how probation and parole agencies managed adult sex offenders and a description of a model management process for containing sex offenders serving community sentences.
 
Managing Adult Sex Offenders in the Community: NIJ Research In Brief

This VAWnet Applied Research document provides an overview of the research on marital rape, ideas for future directions to gain public and scholarly attention to the issue, and a marital rape resource page. An online course on this document is also available.
 
Marital Rape: New Research and Directions
Marital Rape Online Learning Course

This compendium provides research and prevention specialists with a set of tools to evaluate programs to prevent youth violence. The compendium includes more than 100 measures, mostly focused on individuals’ violence-related attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors.
 
Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet presents some basic statistics on sexual violence and its prevalence.

 

The full media packet offers six resources will answer common questions related to sexual violence.

This paper explores how youth and violence have been framed in the media, how the issue of race complicates depictions of youth and violence, and how public attitudes about government can inhibit public support for strategies to effectively prevent violence. Commissioned by UNITY/Prevention Institute and written by the Berkeley Media Studies Group, this paper makes recommendations for the next steps in reframing violence among youth.
Moving From Them to Us: Challenges in Reframing Violence Among Youth

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