The article lists 45 facts about violence against women in the U.S. and globally along with their sources. It also includes a selection of other web site links to find and verify violence against women statistics.
 
Facts about Violence: U.S. Statistics & Global

 

Misconceptions about sexual violence and False Reporting Coverinconsistencies about the way reports are classified reflect gaps in the definition and understanding of a false allegation. This overview provides facts about sexual violence cases and reporting rates.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The article begins by reviewing up-to-date research suggesting that the rate of false reporting for sexual assault is in the range of 2-8%.  It also critiques prior research suggesting that the rate of false reporting is far higher, and explores the reasons why this issue is so challenging for professionals in the field.  Questions addressed in the article include the following:

*    How many sexual assault reports are false?
*    What is the actual definition of a false report?
*    But what if part of the report is false?

The article then concludes with a discussion of how professionals can work to overcome these challenges, and how to handle the frustrating reality of "real" false reports.

False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault

This study identified the characteristics of sexual assault victimizations in Alaska, as recorded by sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) in eight cities, with attention to the key factors that impacted victims' genital injury and case legal resolutions.
 
Final Report: Alaska Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Study

The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) hosted a focus group in Green Bay, Wisconsin to discuss challenges to, and opportunities for, collaboration between states and tribes in Public Law 280 jurisdictions to address sexual assault in Indian country. The Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) provided technical assistance and collaborated with OVW on the design and delivery of the session.
 
Focus Group on Public Law 280 and the Sexual Assault of Native Women

This eNewsletter features a variety of new materials exploring the unique dynamics of violence against women in rural communities. Definitions, characteristics, and statistical overviews of rural populations are provided in addition to specialized resources on developing policy and practice responses for rural victims of domestic and sexual violence. Related resources from VAWnet’s existing collection are also provided in this issue.
 
Focus on Violence Against Women in Rural Communities

The Vera Institute recently released a new guide for organizations that provide sexual violence, domestic violence, and disability services.  This guide seeks to increase avenues for partnership and collaboration between these three types of services, recognizing that people often face co-occurring issues.  The authors of the guide hope to provide background to help meet the needs of women with disabilities, who commonly face sexual and domestic violence, but often do not have access to services that can meet a combination of needs.  This booklet provides information on creating safe, effective, and accessible healing services.

This resource was created using questions and comments from individuals in the anti-sexual violence movement. It addresses commonly asked questions related to language used when working with, reaching out to, and establishing affirming spaces for individuals who identify as LGBTQ. Responses and guidance were provided by practitioners working to further the LGBQT movements.

View this resource.

The following fact sheet offers questions and answers regarding anonymous reporting and forensic exmaniations. Some questions included are:

- What is a "Jane Doe Rape Kit"?
- Who has to comply with VAWA 2005 requirement regarding forensic examination?
- How long are states required to keep forensic examination collection kits?
 
Frequently Asked Questions: Anonymous Reporting and Forensic Examinations

This report examines the role of workplaces, and men in workplaces in particular, in preventing men’s violence against women. It highlights the need for preventative measures oriented to changing the social and structural conditions at the root of this violence, including through settings such as workplaces.

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