This brief assessment tool provides communities with the opportunity to explore community readiness for sexual assault response team development regarding perceptions, resources and services. 

This toolkit is a collection of resources that victim service professional s may use to formalize, expand on, or evaluate their interagency responses to sexual assault. The toolkit includes five main sections:

  • Learn About SARTs briefly reviews the basics: definitions and statistics related to sexual assault, the common makeup of SARTs and the reasons behind setting them up, and a brief historical outline of SART development since the 1970s.
  • Develop a SART lays out the steps involved in putting together your SART. You'll learn how to build your team; collect data about your jurisdiction to help you create a relevant victim response; develop a strategic plan outlining your goals, objectives, and protocol; determine communication standards for your team (e.g., ethical communication, confidentiality); hold effective meetings; monitor and evaluate your victim response; and sustain your SART. This section also includes detailed information about common SART members—describing their roles and responsibilities—and highlights several critical issues related to sexual assault that every SART should know.
  • Put the Focus on Victims describes how victims may be feeling, approaches to responding to various victims, and ways to help victims heal.
  • Follow Innovative Practiceshighlights SART programs from around the country. See what other jurisdictions are doing before setting up or revamping your SART. Programs cover the fields of advocacy, law enforcement, health care, prosecution, and forensics and deal with multidisciplinary issues and culturally specific practices.
  • Find Tools includes sample resources for specific SART members and tools to use when developing your team and evaluating its activities. Find examples of surveys, forms, brochures, guidelines, legislation, memorandums of understanding, and other resources.

 

The Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs (WCSAP) provides a collection of resources and activities to help in facilitating support groups. Activities listed focus on building self-esteem and self-awareness.

Access these resources.

The following four online events are part of a series sponsored by the Government Innovators Network and the National Institute of Justice on sexual violence. Recordings and presenters' slides are now available online for each event in the series: * You must first register with the site to access these pages (which is free and takes only a few seconds).

   1. Sex Offender Residency Restrictions: Implementation and Impact
   2. Sexual Violence and Evidence Collection
   3. Sexual Violence: An International Perspective
   4. Sexual Assault on College Campuses
Series on Sexual Violence

The Winter 2010 edition of WCSAP's newsletter focuses on working with LGBTIQ survivors.  Articles focus on creating safe space, interrupting problematic language, and SANE protocol for working individuals who identify as LGBTIQ.

Access: Setting the Stage: Strategies for Supporting LGBTIQ Survivors

This research report discusses the findings of a study conducted largely in a border town in Mexico.  The researcher conducted in-depth interviews with individuals directly engaged in the sex trade.  According to the report, previous information on human trafficking relied heavily on information provided by agencies responding to it, including advocacy groups and law enforcement, but little direct research has been conducted.  This study sought to determine the extent to which coercion and manipulation were employed and how these operations were organized.

This 2 page fact sheet talks about prisoner rape victims being highly vulnerable to contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.
Sexual Abuse in Detention is a Public Health Issue

This 2 page fact sheet talks about prisoner rape victims being highly vulnerable to contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.
Sexual Abuse in Detention is a Public Health Issue

This toolkit employs art, in various forms, as a universal language and medium for communicating their message about sexual assault prevention and awareness. 

View this toolkit.

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

Read full report.

Download June 12, 2014 Webinar Powerpoint Slides

Read related policy briefs:

 

 

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