This short fact sheet talks about how sexual abuse of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) inmates constitutes one of the most rampant and ignored human rights violations in the U.S. today.
LGBTQ Detainees Chief Targets for Sexual Abuse in Detention
 

This short fact sheet talks about how sexual abuse of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) inmates constitutes one of the most rampant and
ignored human rights violations in the U.S. today.
LGBTQ Detainees Chief Targets for Sexual Abuse in Detention

These fact sheets describe how violence affects other health problems and community concerns, such as chronic diseases, mental illness and poor learning. Children who are scared at school cannot focus on learning, for example, and people are less likely to be active if the local park isn't safe. These fact sheets were designed to persuade educators and those in health, public health and mental health that violence can undermine the work of all sectors, and that everyone should include preventing violence in their efforts. Backed by the latest research, these fact sheets make the case that preventing violence is a key aspect of any vibrant community, one where young people enjoy every opportunity to learn, thrive and excel.

This National Institute of Justice Special Report addresses the question of why backlogs of DNA evidence awaiting testing persist even after the federal government has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to eliminate them. Answering this question requires understanding both what a backlog is and how backlogs can be reduced; this report provides that understanding. (NCJ 230183)

This report describes the successes and challenges of reducing backlogs of DNA evidence in the nation’s crime laboratories and describes some of the solutions that are increasing lab efficiencies. Data was collected from more than 120 public laboratories that receive grants under NIJ’s DNA Backlog Reduction Program.

Learn more.

This resource is designed to help public policy officials, health care professionals, and other pertinent professionals understand how rape in America is measured, what the numbers mean, and what the limitations are of existing research.
 
Making Sense of Rape in America: Where Do the Numbers Come From and What Do They Mean

Esta guía nacional provee descripciones y información sobre recursos disponibles en español sobre la violencia sexual. (This national guide provides descriptions and information on sexual violence resources that are available in Spanish.)

This report from Amnesty International highlights the issue of sexual violence among indigenous women in the United States.  Interviews were conducted with Native American and Alaska Native survivors, their families, activists, support workers, service providers and health workers.  Issues of marginalization and discrimination are discussed as well as jurisdiction, policing, and prosecution problems.  Recommendations for addressing violence against indigenous women are also offered.
 Maze of Injustice

Maze of Injustice, released in 2007, unraveled some of the reasons why Indigenous women in the USA are at such risk of sexual violence and why survivors are so frequently denied justice.

At the one year mark of the release of Maze of Injustice, there is significant, even historical, opportunity for change but there is also real danger that the follow through that is so desperately needed will not happen. It will require working together on all levels to fulfill the promises made.

This update presents the main achievements of the past year in more detail and identifies urgent priorities going forward.
 
Maze of Injustice: The Failure to Protect Indigenous Women from Sexual Violence in the USA

Sexual violence is a complex topic, and journalists reporting on it should be aware that the process can be different from reporting on other crime-related stories. Some survivors may want to talk with the media, while others may not. Remember this is a social justice issue, so there are plenty of story angles and not all include interviewing survivors. Regardless of the angle, infusing stories with data and background information puts this issue into context. Here are some tips for reporters to consider when talking with survivors of sexual violence.

Pages

Subscribe to Rape/Sexual Assault