The NISVS Toolkit is a collection of information on developing a communications plan regarding the data from NISVS, a national study conducted to assess the impact of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. It discusses the scope of these forms of violence; immediate impacts of victimization; and the lifelong heath consequences experienced by victims of these forms of violence. The toolkit provides information on the survey methodology, best ways to interpret and use the data, tips for working with media, and answers to frequently asked questions. Other resources related to this Toolkit include the full Summary Report and a Fact Sheet.

 
View additional resources on the NISVS website.

 

On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

The occurrence of sexual violence is related to one’s access to safe and affordable housing. This is true for both sexual violence perpetration and vicpicture of door of white housetimization. Oppression can both heighten risk and compound the barriers that sexual violence victims and survivors encounter in housing arenas. This guide is intended to equip advocates with information and resources to support their housing advocacy efforts. To these ends, information on housing as both a sexual violence prevention and intervention advocacy area is explored.

 This guide is part of the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. The packet also includes: the National Survey of Advocates on Sexual Violence, Housing, and the Violence Against Women Act; an overview; a fact sheet; an online resource collection; and a technical assistance bulletin on housing and sexual violence.

This issue of the Partners in Social Change Newsletter includes various articles on the topic of engaging men in the movement to end sexual violence.  Topics include guiding principles for men in the movement, reaching queer and trans men, and a "Framework for Engaging Average Joe," among others.

This statement was released in response to the June 22, 2012 verdict in the Sandusky Trial.

In the January 2014 edition of the Reshape newsletter, Eric Stiles discusses the practice of creating sensitive and informed spaces for men and boys accessing services at sexual assault programs. Using trauma-informed strategies and the practice of meeting survivors where they are at, he promotes gender inclusive spaces and programming.

Read the article.

In the January 2014 edition of the Reshape newsletter, Emiliano Diaz de Leon discusses how state coalitions can strategically do outreach to men and boys and increase the capacity of local centers to do the same. He discusses technical assistance approaches, capacity building education ideas, and strategies for raising awareness.

Read the article.

In the January 2014 edition of the Reshape newsletter, Michelle Dixon-Wall discusses the challenges of working within a gendered framework at an anti-violence organization. She discusses barriers that men and boys may have to accessing sexual assault services and programs based on some basic structural practices.

Read the article.

This statement from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) concerns the criminal sentencing of Jerry Sandusky to 30-60 years behind bars for child sexual abuse. NSVRC supports these young men and their loved ones who endured years of pain, waiting for justice to be served. Judge Cleland reassured victims by saying, "It is for your courage, not your assault that you will be remembered." The NSVRC echoes this sentiment and applauds the victims’ strength and courage and hopes today brings them an opportunity to further their own paths to healing. Read full statement.

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