This report illustrates the results of a cross-national study based on in-depth interviews from both experts and average Americans on Sexual Violence. This study, supported by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center comprises the following three components: 1) an analysis of the discourse on sexual violence from expert interviews, 2) one-on-one cognitive interviews with Americans, and 3) a comparative analysis that “maps the gaps” between expert and lay understandings of this topic. The report concludes with a set of recommendations that will improve communications practice around this issue and inform future research.

Read more about the partnership between NSVRC and Frameworks Institute.

This sample letter to the editor was created for use and adaptation for OVW Rural Grantees in order to support the Let's Talk About It Rural Pubic Service Announcement Campaign.

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities.

View the full Media Packet

The following seven resources, included in the packet, will answer common questions related to sexual violence:

What is Sexual Violence?

Statistics about Sexual Violence

Crime Reports of Sexual Violence

People who commit sexual violence

What is Child Sexual Abuse?

The NSVRC at a Glance

Talking with Survivors

Engaging Bystanders

 

 

 

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet discusses crime reports made on sexual violence.

 

This fact sheet is a part of our full Media Packet which offers 6 resources answering common questions about sexual violence.

While some forms of sexual violence may not be illegal, such as sexist jokes, catcalling, or vulgar gestures, this does not make them any less threatening or harmful to the person victimized.  All these behaviors contribute to a culture that accepts sexual violence. Bystanders can speak up when they witness these actions to foster healthy sexuality and safer communities. Many opportunities exist in daily life where society can prevent behaviors that promote sexual violence.

This fact sheet is part of the Media Packet. View the full packet, or other factsheets included in the packet.

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet presents information on people who commit sexual violence.

 

The full Media Packet offers 6 resources that answer common questions related to sexual violence.

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet presents some basic statistics on sexual violence and its prevalence.

 

The full media packet offers six resources will answer common questions related to sexual violence.

Sexual violence is a complex topic, and journalists reporting on it should be aware that the process can be different from reporting on other crime-related stories. Some survivors may want to talk with the media, while others may not. Remember this is a social justice issue, so there are plenty of story angles and not all include interviewing survivors. Regardless of the angle, infusing stories with data and background information puts this issue into context. Here are some tips for reporters to consider when talking with survivors of sexual violence.

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet provides basic information on the history, role, and purpose of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center.

 

The full Media Packet offers six resources will answer common questions related to sexual violence.

Sexual violence -- including rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment -- is a complicated topic to understand. There are many fears, myths and stereotypes that abound. We understand that reporting on these topics is a difficult task and we appreciate the media’s commitment to doing so with integrity. As a result, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) has created a packet for journalists about reporting on sexual violence.

 

As members of the media, journalists play a critical role in illuminating the truth for people. Well-written, fact-based stories that place a particular incident in a broader context can go a long way toward educating the public. A well-informed public can help ensure appropriate responses and services for victims; accountability and treatment for those who abuse others; and can strengthen the prevention strategies of organizations and communities. This fact sheet discusses information on child sexual abuse.

 

The full media packet offers six resources will answer common questions related to sexual violence.

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