On February 26, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report Intimate Partner Violence in the United States- 2010.  The National Sexual Violence Resource provides this set of talking points for highlights on the findings related to sexual violence. For more information on emerging sexual violence research visit the NSVRC xCHANGE forum. A brief summary comparing NISVS to previous national surveys is available at:  National Research on Sexual Violence A Look to the Future

This series of four guides was originally developed for OVC and the grantees who received funding to serve victims of human trafficking. The guides have since been adapted for use by other grantees and organizations that provide programs for victims of any type of crime.

The guides include:

Guide to Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation
Guide to Conducting a Needs Assessment
Guide to Hiring a Local Evaluator
Guide to Protecting Human Subjects

 

In April 2007, WHO held an expert meeting on preventing intimate partner violence and sexual violence. WHO produced a background paper for the meeting. The paper explores what can be done to prevent violence against adolescent and adult women that occurs within intimate relationships, and sexual violence that occurs outside intimate relationships.

In a public health framework, primary prevention means reducing the number of new instances of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence by intervening before any violence occurs. Program and research in primary prevention has lagged efforts in secondary and tertiary prevention, which focus on people who are at risk or already have suffered violence. This background paper helps to close that gap and is the basis for a guideline on intimate partner and sexual violence prevention currently being prepared by WHO, CDC, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Primary prevention of intimate-partner violence and sexual violence: Background paper for WHO expert meeting May 2–3, 2007

This document identifies how the crimes of rape and sexual violence must, as a requirement of its own statute and a matter of international human rights law, be interpreted and applied with equality between men and women by the International Criminal Court (the Court). The Court has yet to rule on this matter in its jurisprudence.
 

This booklet, designed for youth, discusses sexual violence and intimate partner abuse. It suggests ways to evaluate the status of a relationship and how to get involved if you are concerned about someone else's relationship.

Read this booklet.

The purpose of this special collection is to provide resources and an introduction to reproductive justice, focusing particularly on the connections between the elimination of reproductive oppression and domestic and sexual violence. Included is a basic definition of reproductive justice, information about the development and the history of the Reproductive Justice Movement, and related resources. Highlighted in this collection are resources that relate to the holistic well-being of women, families, and communities as it pertains to violence against women and reproductive rights and health. "Reproductive Justice & Violence Against Women: Understanding the Intersections" makes connections between the Reproductive Justice Movement and the Sexual Violence and Domestic Violence Movements in the United States to demonstrate the necessity of collaboration. This collection was developed by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, and the Women of Color Network. Additional resources, including book titles, articles, reports, and journals, can be found by browsing the library at the National Sexual Violence Resource Center or sending information requests to resources@nsvrc.org.

This paper discusses joint approaches in intimate partner violence and sexual violenceprimary prevention. Advocates can learn about strategies for advancing both issues, working with funders and state coalitions, and how to support those implementing dual issue strategies.

View this paper.

The Winter 2010 edition of WCSAP's newsletter focuses on working with LGBTIQ survivors.  Articles focus on creating safe space, interrupting problematic language, and SANE protocol for working individuals who identify as LGBTIQ.

Access: Setting the Stage: Strategies for Supporting LGBTIQ Survivors

Sexual violence & individuals who identify as LGBTQ is an information packet containing nearly a dozen resources focused on serving, engaging, and collaborating with individuals and communities who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning (LGBTQ).  The packet contains resources to support counselors, advocates, preventionists, technical assistance providers, and allied professionals committed to affirming all individuals and communities. The goals of this packet it to provide resources that will both strengthen work already being done, as well as assist organizations in discovering a place to begin program development.

This packet includes an Annotated Bibliography, a Research Brief, a Resource List, and guides on Talking about Gender & Sexuality, Creating Inclusive Agencies, the Process of Coming Out, the Impact of Discrimination, Hate & Bias-Motivated Crimes, the Impact on Individuals & Communities, Sexual Harassment & Bullying of Youth, and Transformative Prevention Programming.

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