This compilation includes existing tools for assessing intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) victimization in clinical/healthcare settings. The purpose of this compilation is to provide practitioners and clinicians with the most current inventory of assessment tools for determining IPV and/or SV victimization and to inform decisions about which instruments are most appropriate for use with a given population. This document will aid in the selection of assessment instruments to identify victims requiring additional services. This can help practitioners make appropriate referrals for both victims and perpetrators.
 
Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence Victimization Assessment Instruments for Use in Healthcare Settings

This report describes the inconsistencies found in statistical reporting of violence against women, and recommends uniform definitions and data elements for uniformity in reporting.
 
Intimate Partner Violence Surveillance: Uniform Definitions and Recommendations Data Elements

The report examines trends in intimate partner violence of persons age 12 or older in the United States.
Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001

 

This three-page fact sheet highlights the importanceSAAM 2012 Consent Cover of consent in healthy sexual interactions and provides information on defining and establishing consent. It includes a scenario and discussion points that highlight consent in a college campus setting. Also available in Spanish.

 

This annual report released by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) identifies the scope and severity of intimate partner violence among LGBTQ partnerships. It includes information on intimate partner sexual violence.

Access this report.

This VAWnet Applied Research document provides an overview of the research on marital rape, ideas for future directions to gain public and scholarly attention to the issue, and a marital rape resource page. An online course on this document is also available.
 
Marital Rape: New Research and Directions
Marital Rape Online Learning Course

This issue addresses the use of deliberate rationales to drive primary prevention efforts. The feature article discusses "etiological theories" and "change theories," and provides examples of how they can be applied to enhance primary SV/IPV prevention work. There is also an article examining how one local Virginia agency implemented a theory-driven prevention project with a local Girl Scout troop. Also provided is a handy appendix that summarizes select theories of individual and group change.
Moving Upstream: Volume 5, Issue 1

The NISVS Fact Sheet provides a brief overview of the data from a national study conducted to assess the impact of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. It discusses the scope of these forms of violence; immediate impacts of victimization; and the lifelong heath consequences experienced by victims of these forms of violence. This information may help to inform policies on prevention and response efforts in the field. Other resources related to this Fact Sheet include the full Summary Report and a Toolkit.

View additional resources on the NISVS website.

This special report describes the national prevalence of intimate partner violence, sexual violence and stalking victimization based on respondents’ sexuNISVS coveral orientation. Respondents who self-identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual at the time of the survey and described violence experienced with both same-sex and opposite-sex partners based on the 2010 data from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).

Read the full report

View the fact sheet

View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

The NSVRC also provides an information packet on Sexual Violence & Individuals Who Identify as LGBTQ. The packet includes general information on the nature of sexual violence against LGBTQ people and understanding effective prevention and response strategies.

The goal of this resource is to provide clear, consistent and straightforward guidance on the essential minimum, core content for sexuality education that is age-appropriate for students in grades K–12. The Standards are presented both by topic area and by grade level.

Pages

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