This manual provides extensive standards of practice for members of interdisciplinary sexual assault response teams.

San Diego County Sexual Assault Response Team Standards of Practice

This brief assessment tool provides communities with the opportunity to explore community readiness for sexual assault response team development regarding perceptions, resources and services. 

This toolkit is a collection of resources that victim service professional s may use to formalize, expand on, or evaluate their interagency responses to sexual assault. The toolkit includes five main sections:

  • Learn About SARTs briefly reviews the basics: definitions and statistics related to sexual assault, the common makeup of SARTs and the reasons behind setting them up, and a brief historical outline of SART development since the 1970s.
  • Develop a SART lays out the steps involved in putting together your SART. You'll learn how to build your team; collect data about your jurisdiction to help you create a relevant victim response; develop a strategic plan outlining your goals, objectives, and protocol; determine communication standards for your team (e.g., ethical communication, confidentiality); hold effective meetings; monitor and evaluate your victim response; and sustain your SART. This section also includes detailed information about common SART members—describing their roles and responsibilities—and highlights several critical issues related to sexual assault that every SART should know.
  • Put the Focus on Victims describes how victims may be feeling, approaches to responding to various victims, and ways to help victims heal.
  • Follow Innovative Practiceshighlights SART programs from around the country. See what other jurisdictions are doing before setting up or revamping your SART. Programs cover the fields of advocacy, law enforcement, health care, prosecution, and forensics and deal with multidisciplinary issues and culturally specific practices.
  • Find Tools includes sample resources for specific SART members and tools to use when developing your team and evaluating its activities. Find examples of surveys, forms, brochures, guidelines, legislation, memorandums of understanding, and other resources.

 

The following document provides a working chart of questions to consider when selecting a database for an organization.  These questions may be useful in determining which database will provide the most benefits in terms of privacy and confidentiality, as well as security.

This report provides a review of innovative policy options for the management of sexual offenders.

This research report from the Western Criminology Review explores the use and effectiveness of sex offender registries. Data for this research was collected from a sample of registered sex offenders.

Sex Offender Registries as a Tool for Public Safety: Views from Registered Offenders

This toolkit employs art, in various forms, as a universal language and medium for communicating their message about sexual assault prevention and awareness. 

View this toolkit.

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

Read full report.

Download June 12, 2014 Webinar Powerpoint Slides

Read related policy briefs:

 

 

This study examined the structure and functioning of U.S. SARTs, patterns of SART implementation and how these patterns relate to SARTs perceived effectiveness at improving victim and legal outcomes.

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