This guide examines the use of polygraph tests and other truth-telling devices (sometimes called “lie-detector tests”) in sexual assault investigations. It is meant to support the Violence Against Women Act and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (VAWA 2005) provision that truth-telling devices must not be used with sexual assault victims as a condition of charging or prosecution of an offense. This guide examines special issues relevant to using truth-telling devices with sexual assault victims. Legislative and judicial actions that have been taken as a result of this debate will also be discussed. Victim advocates, law enforcement officers, and policy makers may use this guide to develop policies, practices, and procedures and to improve collaborations regarding the use of truth-telling devices as the VAWA 2005 provision is adopted across the United States. 

These guidelines provide a comprehensive set of recommended practices for multidisciplinary teams responding to sex crimes. It also includes course outline for Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners.
Sexual Assault Response Team Guidelines

This booklet introduces a new approach to helping victims of sexual violence. This approach, called the victim-centered “Sex Offender Containment Model”, may be a significant change in the way some of you do your advocacy work. It uses a multidisciplinary team approach to working with probation and parole, law enforcement, treatment providers, and others on a Sex Offender Containment Team.

This resource contains the following segments: New directions in victims’ rights – New directions for criminal and juvenile justice system agencies (Law enforcement, Prosecution, Judiciary, Corrections) – New directions for victim assistance and allied professionals (Health care, Mental health, Legal, Educational, Faith, Business, News media) – New directions for financial recovery – New directions for child victims – New directions in international victim assistance.
 
New Directions From the Field: Victims Rights’ and Services for the 21st Century

This replication guide highlights one region’s efforts to address the difficulties of starting and sustaining SANE programs in rural areas. This guide was developed to help other rural regions decide whether a mobile SANE project, customized to their local needs, might be a viable option. It provides a checklist for replicating the project and access to materials developed during its implementation.

Related Resource:

West Virginia Mobile SANE Project, Final Report
This report details the process used in selecting the site and implementing the project as well as includes some of the documents created, such as job descriptions and contracts.
 
 
Implementing SANE Programs in Rural Communities

This research report from the Western Criminology Review explores the use and effectiveness of sex offender registries. Data for this research was collected from a sample of registered sex offenders.

Sex Offender Registries as a Tool for Public Safety: Views from Registered Offenders

This manual provides extensive standards of practice for members of interdisciplinary sexual assault response teams.

San Diego County Sexual Assault Response Team Standards of Practice

The Guide identifies issues and considerations unique to survivors who have experienced multiple victimizations and have multiple needs and describes advocacy and organizational approaches. Developed specifically for rape crisis centers and victim advocates working within criminal justice system agencies, the Guide offers practical strategies for assessing and enhancing responses to this specific population. 

This report examines findings from 14 focus groups that were conducted to obtain feedback from victim advocates and practitioners concerning how researchers, practitioners and advocates can work together more effectively to conduct research on violence against women.
Fostering Collaborations to Prevent Violence Against Women: Integrating Findings From Practitioner Researcher Focus Groups

This guide delineates the benefits of forming a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of professionals from law enforcement, child protective services, prosecution, medicine, counseling, and related fields to investigate cases of child abuse and neglect. It offers guidance on convening team participants, writing a mission statement, establishing protocols, promoting teamwork, and preventing burnout and addresses the importance of confidentiality policies, conflict resolution practices, and periodic review. The guide also includes an extensive list of related readings and contact information for organizations that offer training and technical assistance to MDT's.
 
Forming a Multidisciplinary Team to Investigate Child Abuse

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