This report examines findings from 14 focus groups that were conducted to obtain feedback from victim advocates and practitioners concerning how researchers, practitioners and advocates can work together more effectively to conduct research on violence against women.
Fostering Collaborations to Prevent Violence Against Women: Integrating Findings From Practitioner Researcher Focus Groups

The report, Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence, represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women - both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. The study highlights the need for all sectors to engage in eliminating tolerance for violence against women and better support for women who experience it. New WHO guidelines, launched with the report, aim to help countries improve their health sector's capacity to respond to violence against women.

 

View the infographic.

 

See the full report.

 

 

The Guide identifies issues and considerations unique to survivors who have experienced multiple victimizations and have multiple needs and describes advocacy and organizational approaches. Developed specifically for rape crisis centers and victim advocates working within criminal justice system agencies, the Guide offers practical strategies for assessing and enhancing responses to this specific population. 

This paper discusses the importance of integrating holistic healing approaches into direct services in order to support survivors. It looks at approaches to community collaboration and funding as well as providing examples from the field and information about a variety of specific holistic healing modalities. The research addendum offers further support for programs and administrators seeking to provide or augment these services.

Safe, affordable, and stable housing can be a protective factor against both sexual violence perpetration and victimization. In 2008, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center partnered with the Victims Rights Law Center, National Sexual Assault Coalition Resource Sharing Project, Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault, University of New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania Community Legal Services to develop and conduct a national survey on housing and sexual violence. The information gained from this study led to the development of several resources to support advocacy at the intersections of housing and sexual violence.

This information packet includes: the National Survey of Advocates on Sexual Violence, Housing, and the Violence Against Women Act; an overview; a fact sheet; an online resource collection; a technical assistance bulletin; a research brief; an infographic; and an advocate's guide to housing and sexual violence.

This replication guide highlights one region’s efforts to address the difficulties of starting and sustaining SANE programs in rural areas. This guide was developed to help other rural regions decide whether a mobile SANE project, customized to their local needs, might be a viable option. It provides a checklist for replicating the project and access to materials developed during its implementation.

Related Resource:

West Virginia Mobile SANE Project, Final Report
This report details the process used in selecting the site and implementing the project as well as includes some of the documents created, such as job descriptions and contracts.
 
 
Implementing SANE Programs in Rural Communities

This guide is a part of the Critical Issues in Policing Series and offers information and tools based on updated statistical findings on prevalence and incidence of sexual assault, changes in crime reporting definitions, special considerations in working with cases of sexual violence, and feedback from advocates on the benefits of incorporating external review.

See this publication.

The April 2011 issue of the Justice Resource Update newsletter includes information on addressing youth violence, sexual assault kit researchers, information and resources for Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs), and information the prevalence of violence in the workplace.

This booklet introduces a new approach to helping victims of sexual violence. This approach, called the victim-centered “Sex Offender Containment Model”, may be a significant change in the way some of you do your advocacy work. It uses a multidisciplinary team approach to working with probation and parole, law enforcement, treatment providers, and others on a Sex Offender Containment Team.

This National Institute of Justice Special Report addresses the question of why backlogs of DNA evidence awaiting testing persist even after the federal government has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to eliminate them. Answering this question requires understanding both what a backlog is and how backlogs can be reduced; this report provides that understanding. (NCJ 230183)

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