This reports documents hate-motivated violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people in 2009 in the United States as reported to member organizations of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP). It includes statistics, trends, narratives and responses and recommendations for change.

 
This report presents baseline information on pregnancies, births, sexual history and behavior, contraceptive use, non-voluntary sex, and unintended pregnancy among urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women nationwide.

Foundations play a critical role in supporting efforts to address gender-based violence, yet little research has been conducted on the level or type of funding in the U.S. Spurred by the paucity of data and analysis, the Ms. Foundation for Women undertook a multi-pronged study to measure the scope, focus and impact of funding in this area. Coinciding with the 15th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, this report reviews the progress foundations have made in addressing gender based violence in order to sketch the current philanthropic landscape and its potential for growth.

This National Institute of Justice Special Report addresses the question of why backlogs of DNA evidence awaiting testing persist even after the federal government has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to eliminate them. Answering this question requires understanding both what a backlog is and how backlogs can be reduced; this report provides that understanding. (NCJ 230183)

This report provides a review of innovative policy options for the management of sexual offenders.

This report, the product of a 2009 survey of victim assistance providers and LGBTQ anti-violence programs throughout the United States, describes widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime and recommends steps to improve both the services and their accessibility.
 

This report documents women’s experiences of harassment, financial control, control over their course and institution choices, stalking, violence, and sexual assault.

Using 2007 National Crime Victimization Survey data, BJS estimates that about one third (34%) of the crimes against persons with or without a disability in 2007 were serious violent crimes (rape/sexual assault, robbery, or aggravated assault). Persons with disabilities were victims of about 47,000 rapes.  Rates of rape and sexual assault were more than twice those for people without disabilities. Youth with a disability ages 12 to 19 experienced violence at nearly twice the rate as those without a disability. People with cognitive disabilities had a higher risk of violent victimization than persons with any other type of disability. Nearly 1 in 5 violent crime victims with a disability believed that they became a victim because of their disability.

This electronic report contains text summaries, audio recordings, and videos from MNCASA’s Minnesota Summit to Prevent Sexual Violence held in St. Paul, December 3-4, 2009. This report is designed to provide ideas and resources for leading prevention initiatives in your spheres of influence

(This E-Report is an evolving document. We encourage you to check back for updates on outcomes, actions, and resources)
The Minnesota Summit to Prevent Sexual Violence E-Report

This 20th annual World Report summarizes human rights conditions in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide. It reflects extensive investigative work undertaken in 2009 by Human Rights Watch staff, usually in close partnership with human rights activists in the country in question.

World Report 2010

 

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