The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

See only NSVRC publications

Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

We invite you to send additional materials for our resource collection to resources@nsvrc.org.

This policy paper discusses public health prevention efforts to encourage a shift in focus from intervention and treatment following an assault to primary prevention--the prevention of sexual abuse before it is perpetrated.

This policy paper offers recommendations for implementation of registration and notification based on existing research about the assessment and management of sex offenders.

This policy paper is an overview of the treatment and intervention with sex offenders and the need to develop strategies to eradicate sexual abuse and the risks those offenders pose to society.

This policy paper discusses implementing randomized clinical trials including the following six considerations; clear rationale for use of randomization, well-defined treatment and comparison intervention conditions, group equivalence, program evaluation/treatment outcome, participant attrition and data analysis.

This publication discusses reshaping sex offender public policy through a comprehensive approach and new collaborative models through cross-disciplinary professional partners; to craft new policies that prevent abuse before it is perpetrated and re-offenses.

Continued research into the causes and courses of sexual aggression is the life-blood of ATSA and essential to its mission of reducing sexual abuse. This policy paper discusses the protection of research participants as a serious concern, especially in the study of sexual aggression.

The focus of this policy paper is civil commitment programs in the United States. The use of civil commitment for sexual offenders has generated considerable debate in legal and clinical professions, and it continues to be debated even among professionals who work with and conduct research on sexual offenders.

The goal of this document is to provide relevant information for reducing sexual reoffending by adolescents and promoting effective interventions that facilitate pro-social and law-abiding behaviors. This document is purposefully short in length, summarizes central findings from the research, and outlines some major areas for consideration when working with this population of youth and their families.

Sexual assault within the military continues to occur at alarming levels with 26,000 anonymously reported incidents in 2012 alone according to Department of Defense (DoD) estimates. During this same period, only 3,300 service members reported their assaults. Meanwhile, the nation is confronted with headlines of high level military sexual assault leaders acting in sexually abusive ways. Combined with the heart-wrenching stories of survivors, these facts reveal the depth of the problem of military sexual assault (MSA) and demand incisive action.

 The Office for Victims of Crime is pleased to announce the release of the Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report, the first comprehensive assessment of the victim assistance field in nearly 15 years. The Vision 21 initiative gave participants the opportunity to engage with a broad spectrum of service providers, advocates, criminal justice professionals, allied practitioners, and policymakers to address crime victim issues through a lens broader than their everyday work. The result of this collective examination, the report seeks to permanently transform the way crime victims are treated in this country. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report discusses the following:

  • Major challenges to the integration of research into victim services.
  • The tremendous need for crime victims to have access to legal assistance to address the wide range of legal issues that can arise following victimization.
  • The impact of advances in technology, globalization, and changing demographics on the victim assistance field.
  • The capacity for serving victims in the 21st century and some of the infrastructure issues that must be overcome to reach that capacity.

Furthermore, the final report outlines recommendations for beginning the transformative change, which fall into the following four broad categories:

  • Conducting continuous rather than episodic strategic planning in the victim assistance field to effect real change in research, policy, programming, and capacity building.
  • Supporting research to build a body of evidence-based knowledge and generate, collect, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data on victimization, emerging victimization trends, services and behaviors, and victims’ rights enforcement efforts.
  • Ensuring the statutory, policy, and programmatic flexibility to address enduring and emerging crime victim issues.
  • Building and institutionalizing capacity through an infusion of technology, training, and innovation to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the demands of the 21st century.

Pages

Subscribe to Publications