The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

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Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

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This report exposes the ways in which we criminalize girls in the United States— especially girls of color — who have been sexually and physically abused, and it offers policy recommendations to dismantle the abuse to prison pipeline. It illustrates the pipeline with examples, including the detention of girls who are victims of sex trafficking, girls who run away or become truant because of abuse they experience, and girls who cross into juvenile justice from the child welfare system. By illuminating both the problem and potential solutions, the authors hope to make the first step toward ending the cycle of victimization-to-imprisonment for marginalized girls.

Esta traducción resume los principales hallazgos del estudio “La victimización de Violencia Sexual y de las asociaciones de la salud en una muestra de la comunidad de las mujeres hispanas,” realizado por K. C. Basile, S.G. Smith, M.L. Walters, D.N. Fowler, K. Hawk y M.E. Hamburger. Los hallazgos del estudio se basan en nuestra comprensión de los efectos de la violencia sexual en mujeres latinas y pueden orientar nuestras estrategias tanto de prevención de la violencia sexual como de respuesta a ésta.

En inglés.

Sexual violence can result in many health, economic, and social struggles in the lives of survivors. This resource highlights findings from a 2015 study on sexual violence against Latina women. Findings can help strengthen our prevention and response strategies with Latin@ communities. In

This toolkit provides resources and support to build language access as a core service for survivors with LEP. The tabs at the top link to:

  • A step-by-step process for developing your first written Language Access Plan, and a guide to critical conversations to enhance an existing Language Access Plan.
  • Tools to help you establish your program’s language access standards and make them part of your program’s day-to-day work, such as language skill assessments, interpreter code of ethics and confidentiality forms, and multilingual materials (I Speak cards, translated materials, etc.).
  • These are management tools your program may use regularly; and direct advocacy tools for use by and with survivors with LEP.
  • Descriptions and analysis of specific language access strategies such as language identification and interpreter services.
  • Support to help you advocate for language access services throughout the community: training curriculum and systems advocacy guidance.
  • Resources, such as federal law and guidance, sample plans, and promising practices to help you shape your efforts. These are informational resources you may need to build your own Language Access Plan and for systems advocacy.


To contribute to the dissemination of new brain research as it applies to those
serving children and youth, Child Trends invited Jane Roskams, Ph.D., a leading
neuroscientist and executive director of strategy and alliances at the Allen
Institute for Brain Science, to speak. Dr Roskams is a long-standing researcher
in the field of brain repair and epigenetics. She revealed new developments
in our understanding of how the brain grows and learns, and how it adapts
to its environment and trauma. Following her presentation, Dr. Kristin Moore,
Child Trends’ senior scholar and past president, moderated a discussion on the
practical implications of shifting views on brain development and resiliency. The
discussion aimed to inform programs and policies that affect young people,
particularly at-risk children. It featured two repondents: Daniel Cardinali,
President of Communities In Schools, the nation's largest drop-out prevention
program; and Dianna Walters of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative.
This research brief summarizes their presentations.

These slides were created to support the June 2015 Online xCHANGE Forum: Sexual violence in the lives of African American Women.  This forum will explore current research on the sexual victimization of African American women and future needs for the field.

View the entire slideshow.

View slides by forum topic:

Historical Overview

National Studies

Risk Factors


Physical and Mental Health Consequences

Culturally Sensitive Treatment

View the entire archive of the xCHANGE Forum.

The U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights has released a new guidance package on Title IX coordinators.  This package helps clarify that coordinator's roles and responsibilitie​s, as well as ways that schools should support the work of their Title IX coordinators.  The package includes details about the scope and administrative requirements of Title IX, as well as recommendations and discussion of key related issues.  It urges institutions to do as much as possible to eliminate conflicts of interest for Title IX coordinators, and to support Title IX coordinators through promoting their visibility and providing for their training.

This report includes data released from the global Violence Against Children Surveys (VACS) and suggests that at least 25% of females and 10% of males have experienced childhood sexual violence, with less than 10% of those victims receiving the supportive care that they need.

For the full report and the study details, please visit

Recent research suggests that Deaf women experience higher rates of sexual and domestic violence than their hearing counterparts, but are often shut off from victim services and supports that are ill-equipped to respond to their unique needs. As a result, they are denied access to services that could help them safely flee from abuse, heal from trauma, and seek justice after they have been harmed. This policy brief offers practical suggestions for expanding and enhancing Deaf survivors’ access to victim services and other supports.


This practitioner focused report of findings from a national research project on Sexual Assault Response Team functioning and effectiveness.

The full version of the technical research report to the National Institute of Justice is available online.
Scientific publications of the data in peer-reviewed journals with full methodological details are also available.


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