A guide for youth on activism, healthy sexuality, and sexual violence prevention. In Spanish.

The 2014 National Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign focuses on healthy sexuality and young people. This campaign provides tools on healthy adolescent sexuality and engaging youth. Learn how you can play a role in promoting a healthy foundation for relationships, development, and sexual violence prevention. SAAM 2014 engages adults in supporting positive youth development, and encourages young people to be activists for change. This April, use your voice to impact our future.

Many resources also are available in Spanish.

2014 resources include:

Healthy Adolescent Sexual Development Resources

An overview of healthy adolescent sexual development

Best practices for engaging youth as partners in sexual violence prevention

Strategies for becoming an adult ally

Safe Sex(uality): Talking about what you need and want

Becoming an agent of social change: A guide for youth activists

 

Campaign materials

Event planning guide

Social media toolkit

How to create a campaign

Proclamation

Proclamation for a healthy future

Sample letter to the editor

Tips for partnering with youth-serving organizations

Prevention tips for medical professionals

Understanding sexual violence: Tips for parents and caregivers

 

The purpose of this guide is to assist physicians, nurses, and other clinical health care providers in meeting their professional obligations in identifying and providing intervention and treatment to older victims of sexual violence. It includes introductory information, such as definitions and a problem statement, as well as scenarios. Additionally, it discusses issues relevant to health care providers, such as practice recommendations, provider responsibilities, gathering patient history, examination, and evidence collection.

This infographic is a visual snapshot of some of the statistics included in the NSVRC publication “Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates.” See the guide for more in-depth information. 

This guide focuses on the impact of sexual violence in the military. It includes resources for advocates who, through relationships and collaborations with the military, can offer support in responding to the needs of survivors and preventing sexual violence.

The following documents are available: "Sexual Violence in the Military: A Guide for Civilian Advocates," an infographic, and talking points.

NSVRC STATEMENT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

In response to WaPo Fact Checker: One rape is too many

HARRISBURG, PA –  Sexual violence is complex and hard to talk about, but the fact is that sexual violence is an issue of epidemic proportions that impacts all of society. The February 12 column by Glenn Kessler in the Washington Post questions the accuracy of statistics about sexual assault, second-guesses research design and respondent ability to understand plainly worded questions, and ultimately infers that drug- or alcohol-facilitated sexual assaults are not legitimate.

Sexual violence occurs when a person chooses to exploit a vulnerability they see in another person—and this criminal behavior can take place whether or not alcohol or drugs are involved.

In fact, offenders use drugs and alcohol strategically when it comes to sexual assault: they know that someone who is severely intoxicated is often unable to stay conscious, have control of their bodies or surroundings and are likely to have gaps in memory; perpetrators use drugs or alcohol to lower their own inhibitions; and they rely on public opinion to not take reports of sexual assault seriously if the victim and/or offender were intoxicated. The offenders count on “us” to excuse their actions.

This offender strategy happens both on and off college campuses, and calling this common reality into question, or questioning statistics that have been consistently in the same range for two decades, distracts from efforts to prevent and respond to the very real and all-too-pervasive problem of sexual violence.

One rape is too many. The experience of sexual assault can be devastating, often derailing the pursuit of education, disrupting relationships, destroying a survivor’s sense of safety in the world and creating doubts about self-worth and a survivor’s ability to determine whom they can and cannot trust. Sexual assault damages campus communities and our society as a whole.

Statistics represent the stories of the countless survivors of sexual violence, many of whom were afraid to tell their friends, go to the police or confide in their families; their fears are largely rooted in the knowledge that their stories and actions—and thus their pain—are likely to be doubted by a culture that needs to do much better in listening to survivors. We appreciate the President of the United States publicly prioritizing sexual assault prevention and urging others to do the same.

The NSVRC knows that traumatizing acts of sexual violence are widespread and affect all genders, races, ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. The NSVRC is committed to sexual violence prevention, providing research-based resources and fostering collaboration at the local, state and national-level. For positive change to occur, it is imperative that we develop a full and accurate understanding of the sexual violence epidemic, both on and off college campuses. We remain steadfastly committed to improving the quality of public health services and support to victims and their families, and to supporting communities in encouraging victims to seek help and report these crimes.

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), founded by the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape (PCAR) in 2000, creates and disseminates resources to assist advocates, allies, and journalists working across the globe to address and prevent all forms of sexual violence.

For more information, visit www.nsvrc.org. For help and services across the U.S., access NSVRC’s online directory at http://tinyurl.com/USdirectory.

The 2013-2014 Department of Defense’s annual assessment focusing on sexual violence and the Military Service Academies’ effectiveness of policies, training, and procedures has been released. Data includes instances of sexual violence that involve cadets/midshipmen as victims and/or subjects of sexual assault investigations from June 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014. These talking points highlight key findings.
 

Cover-overviewThis overview provides information on the prevention of sexual violence on college and university campuses. It is part of the 2015 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) Campaign resource kit

The Sexual Assault Demonstration Initiative (SADI) Newsletter serves as a project brief to the field on the first national demonstration initiative designed to identify and disseminate information on promising practices for enhancing services to sexual violence survivors in dual and multi-service agencies. This edition provides information and tools related to organizational trauma and creating resilient organizations.
 

Read Summer 2013 Edition.

Read Winter 2014 Edition.

The 2015 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign provides resources on campus sexual violence prevention. Help us create communities that prevent violence and build campuses that respond well.  Everyone can play a role in creating safer campuses. 

This is a toolkit for advocates, campus personnel, students and allies. These materials can be used to engage the entire community  to take action to end sexual assault.

Spanish language resources will be posted soon.

2015 SAAM resources include:

Resources for preventing campus sexual violence

An overview on campus sexual violence prevention

What is healthy sexuality and consent?

What is campus sexual violence?

Action steps for health care professionals

Action steps for faculty and staff

Action steps for campus administrators

Campaign planning resources

How to create a campaign

Event planning guide

Prevention tips for medical professionals

Proclamation

Proclamation for a healthy future

Sample Letter to the Editor

Social Media Toolkit

Understanding sexual violence: Tips for parents and caregivers

Building partnerships with youth organizations

 

 

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - NSVRC Publications