The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

See only NSVRC publications

Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

We invite you to send additional materials for our resource collection to resources@nsvrc.org.

The Sexual Assault Awareness Month Event Planning Guide is a resource to help plan effective SAAM campaigns in your community.

The Sexual Assault Awareness Month Campaign Planning Guide is a resource to help create a community-wide SAAM campaign.

This document provides a list of event ideas can help in planning an effective Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign. While April is only one month out of the year, SAAM events can provide excellent opportunities to establish partnerships, launch new campaigns and programs, and initiate prevention activities that will continue throughout the year and beyond.

The Fall/Winter 2016 edition of The Resource includes:

Director’s Viewpoint: Karen Baker, NSVRC Director, discusses the steps the movement is taking, from the launch of Raliance to the new documentary Audrie & Daisy.

Raliance launch: New collaborative initiative Raliance writes about their goal of ending sexual violence in one generation.

Audrie & Daisy focuses on early education: In a Q&A, co-director of Audrie & Daisy Bonni Cohen shares the film’s impact and talks about the importance of early education in sexual violence prevention.

Collaborating to end the sexual abuse to prison pipeline: The National Organization for Women shares their plan for ending the sexual abuse to prison pipeline that disproportionately affects young women of color and transgender youth.

Member centers in Connecticut create K-12 prevention programs: One Connecticut center shares lessons learned when developing prevention curricula for K-12 schools.

This issue also includes a look back at the first year of PreventConnect Campus, a sneak peek at Sexual Assault Awareness Month 2017, and a recognition of the Multilingual Access Project Advisory.

Do you have an idea for a future story? Send your ideas to resources@nsvrc.org with the subject line “Resource Story Idea.”

The Sexual Assault Demonstration Initiative (SADI) was created to enhance sexual assault outreach, services, and community partnerships in dual/multi-­‐service programs. Six sites across the nation engaged in a four-­‐year process of assessment, planning, and implementation of new and enhanced services and organizational capacity building. The Final Report provides concrete lessons learned and recommendations for funders, technical assistance providers, and dual/multi-­‐service programs.

In September 2016, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault released guidance for school districts around creating and sustaining a specific sexual misconduct policy, specifically recommending that districts address sexual violence prevention in their policy. These talking points offer additional suggestions on how to include prevention in a comprehensive sexual misconduct policy for grades K-12.

As part of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, the CDC was tasked with identifying promising practices to prevent sexual violence on college and university campuses. In collaboration with the Department of Justice’s Office of Violence against Women, Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART) Office, and the Department of Education this tool offers an overview of how to approach sexual violence prevention on college campuses with real-world examples from the field.

This case study examines the evaluation process of a violence prevention curriculum called “Walking in Balance With All Our Relations: A Violence Prevention Curriculum for Indigenous People.”

As Virginia’s leading voice on sexual and domestic violence, the Virginia Sexual & Domestic Violence Action Alliance believes all college students have the right to learn and live in an educational environment where they are safe and  treated equally. This is the overarching spirit of Title IX, the Clery Act, and Virginia campus safety legislation. The presence of sexual violence, dating/domestic violence, stalking, and other gender-based violence threatens this right. We also know that institutional and societal oppressions compound the negative effects of violence on students of color and other historically marginalized groups. We have heard from Virginia’s colleges and universities that you/they are hungry for concrete guidelines and examples of promising and best practices in Virginia and nationwide; to respond to this gap in resources, we researched and wrote a set of best practices guides for Virginia’s college and university campuses.

What makes these guides different from the other best practices guides for campuses?

The Safety and Justice for All guides outline best-practice recommendations to help campus professionals move beyond regulatory compliance and to institute trauma-informed and racial justice oriented prevention and responses to gender-based violence.

Recommendations are based on specific roles on campus

Key recommendations included in the guides are organized into six groups:

  • administrators;
  • advocates (both on- and off-campus);
  • faculty and other instructional employees;
  • Title IX coordinators and campus disciplinary professionals;
  • campus law enforcement and security officers; and
  • prevention specialists.

We created an edition specifically for Community Colleges

Due to the unique context of Virginia’s Community Colleges, we created a separate guide for those institutions. The structure and framework for the Community College guide are the same; several recommendations in this guide were adapted to address Community College specific concerns and utilize Community College examples.

Virginia’s colleges, universities, and community colleges are doing excellent work to respond to and prevent gender-based violence. These guides feature concrete examples of ways that institutions and organizations have implemented these recommendations, with the majority of the examples coming from Virginia institutions.

Many victim advocates have increasingly recognized the benefits of working more closely with sex offender treatment and management professionals, and those systems, in turn, are working to become more victim-centered in their approaches.  In 2012, the Center for Sex Offender Management (CSOM) was awarded an Office on Violence Against Women Technical Assistance grant to develop resources related to this type of collaboration.  CSOM partnered with the Resource Sharing Project, the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, and NSVRC, over the next few years to develop resources and trainings.  The first phase of this process involved surveying victim advocates, sex offender treatment providers, and management officers to identify the current level of cross-disciplinary collaboration occurring in communities.  All three groups, interestingly, indicated a strong desire for more collaboration with their local counterparts; however very little meaningful collaboration was actually occurring at the time.  The surveys further identified some of the common barriers being lack of understanding of one another’s roles and responsibilities; differing language and philosophies; and not knowing how to get started.  The four collaborative partners worked together to create resources and tools to begin to address some of these common barriers, and to facilitate stronger collaborations.

"Promoting Collaboration Between Victim Advocates and Sex Offender Management Professionals: A Resource Package" is the first tool produced by this collaboration.

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