The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

See only NSVRC publications

Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

We invite you to send additional materials for our resource collection to resources@nsvrc.org.

The Spring/Summer 2016 edition of The Resource highlights culture in a number of ways:

  • Director’s Viewpoint: Karen Baker, NSVRC Director, discusses how changes in the culture surrounding sexual violence have been prominent this year, from the Oscars to the White House.
  • Evaluation is for everyone: Multicultural Efforts to end Sexual Assault (MESA) shares their culturally relevant evaluation process, from building a framework to implementing strategies in the community.
  • West Virginia’s online academy provides needed resources: West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information and Services (WVFRIS) developed an online training academy for service providers.
  • Community Integrity Program uses evidence-based practices: Princeton University’s Community Integrity Program is a secondary prevention program that holds individuals who offend accountable.
  • For some patients, there is a correlation between sexual trauma and disordered eating: Pennsylvania Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine shares the connections between sexual trauma and eating disorders.

This issue also includes a look back at this year’s Sexual Assault Awareness Month, a spotlight on the Hawaii Coalition Against Sexual Assault’s Community Action Teams, and several milestones for NSVRC.

Do you have an idea for a future story? Send your ideas to resources@nsvrc.org with the subject line “Resource Story Idea.”

Sexual assault is a widespread problem on college campuses. This tip sheet provides information for families to discuss regarding campus sexual assault as well as safety, consent, and healthy relationships. A list of questions to ask about how your child’s college handles sexual assault is also included.

NSVRC's xCHANGE Forum summer series is an opportunity for those working to end sexual violence to exchange information and explore new research. Through live discussion researchers, advocates, and practitioners can connect to better understand current research, best practices, and emerging needs.

The National Institute of Justice released a report on violence experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. Using data from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS), the report provides an in-depth look at the prevalence of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. The report also looked at the impact of violence on victims. These talking points highlight key findings.

 
This guide is written for sexual assault program advocates working with families who are considering reunification with someone who has sexually offended. It provides an overview of the reunification process and how to navigate the process of clarification, reconnection, and reunification.

 

(Text from Disability Rights Wisconsin website)

Developed through the Violence Against Women with Disabilities and Deaf Women Project of Wisconsin, A Practical Guide for Creating Trauma-Informed Disability, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Organizations highlights and explores effective trauma-informed conditions or core values that victims, survivors and people with disabilities find essential for safety and healing. The Guide leads readers on a journey of exploration into the context of these conditions to promote dialogue and understanding, and spur implementation of strategies for domestic violence, sexual assault and disability organizations to become more trauma-informed. December 2011

Developing and supporting healthy relationships is critical to preventing sexual violence. This infographic, developed in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, presents 5 keys of healthy relationships. Read more about healthy relationships.

Download the infographic.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed technical packages to help states and communities take advantage of the best available evidence to prevent violence.

One of the technical packages available is:

What is a technical package?

A technical package is a collection of strategies that represent the best available evidence to prevent or reduce public health problems like violence. They can help improve the health and well-being of communities. A technical package has three parts.

  • The strategy lays out the direction or actions to achieve the goal of preventing violence.
  • The approach includes the specific ways to advance the strategy. This can be accomplished through programs, policies, and practices.
  • The evidence for each of the approaches in preventing violence or its associated risk factors is included as the third component.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed technical packages to help states and communities take advantage of the best available evidence to prevent violence.

One of the technical packages available is:

What is a technical package?

A technical package is a collection of strategies that represent the best available evidence to prevent or reduce public health problems like violence. They can help improve the health and well-being of communities. A technical package has three parts.

  • The strategy lays out the direction or actions to achieve the goal of preventing violence.
  • The approach includes the specific ways to advance the strategy. This can be accomplished through programs, policies, and practices.
  • The evidence for each of the approaches in preventing violence or its associated risk factors is included as the third component.

You can use social networking sites to engage online communities in sexual violence prevention. Social media tools can help spread awareness and advocate for social change. This toolkit offers guidance on how to best utilize the resources of this year’s campaign online. 

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