Internet Safety Online Resource Collection

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center compiled this collection of resources on internet safety to help educate and advocate for a safer virtual world as part of our efforts to eliminate sexual violence. Check us out on Facebook or Twitter, and sign up for our eNewsletter for regular information and updates.

Overview
General Internet and Technology Safety
Internet Safety
Privacy
Mobile Devices
Social Networking and Media
Video-Sharing
Blogging
Internet Safety and Sexual Violence
For those who have experienced violence or abuse
Child Abuse and Pornography Online
Advocacy and Intervention Through Technology
Safe Online Dating
Internet Safety for Families
For Parents and Caregivers
For Teens
For Kids
Internet Safety for Educators
Tools for the Classroom
Using Social Media
Prevention and Intervention
Internet Safety for Advocates
Prevention, Intervention, and Advocacy
Online Counseling
Social Media and Violence
 Digital Abuse
Online Safety Issues
Cyberbullying, Cyberstalking, and Sexting
Additional Resources
 
Interactive internet sites, including social networking, blogging, video sharing and virtual worlds burst into mainstream culture. Increasingly, everyone from preschoolers to professionals find new ways of using internet and technology to learn, explore, advertise and communicate. With such amazing communication tools available, people connect quickly and easily with whatever or whomever they need to. While advocates, educators, students, and friends often use the internet to create change, raise awareness, or build relationships, some internet tools have been used in negative ways as well.
This special collection offers a few of the resources available online which encourage internet and technology safety. Some of these resources are especially pertinent to people who are working through experiences of sexual violence, whether through technology safety planning or protecting personal privacy. Other tools listed here provide information for advocates, educators, families, and individuals working to make the internet a safe place to learn and explore. 
Recently, terms like cyberbullying and cyberstalking have been used to describe forms of digital abuse and harassment. If you or someone you know has experienced abusive or hurtful interactions online, some of these resources may help to rebuild security in your digital world. It is important to keep in mind that online activity and technology use can be monitored in many ways. If you feel it is unsafe to view this site, information may be available by calling 1-877-739-3895 or calling your local rape crisis center.
 
 
General Internet and Technology Safety: This section provides resources on general safety for the internet, protecting personal privacy, mobile devices, social networking & media, video-sharing and blogging. These resources may be helpful for anyone interested in developing safer internet and technology practices.

Internet Safety

2009 Internet Crimes Report (26 p.) by the National White Collar Crime Center (2010). This resource provides information on the internet related crimes reported during 2009. It offers an executive summary of those crimes, as well as specific statistics on types of crimes reported and investigated.

Guide to Internet Terms: A Glossary by the Internet Education Foundation (1998-2008). This resource provides a glossary of internet terms in common use.

 Information and Online Resources (2 p.) by Childnet International (2009). This resource sheet provides brief descriptions and links to online resources for individuals working to keep children safe online. It includes resources on social networking, search engines, blogs, filters, and computer safety and security.

Online Threats to Youth: Solicitation, Harassment, and Problematic Content (80 p.) by Andrew Schrock and danah boyd (2008). This resource offers a review of literature on internet safety. It seeks to answer questions about the threats faced by youth online, which youth are most at risk, and how threats may be interrelated.

Safety and Privacy in a Digital World (1 p.) by VAWnet Online Resource Center. This page provides a list of resources and information on technology safety.

US-CERT Cyber Security Tip ST05-002 -- Keeping Children Safe Online (1 p.) by Mindi McDowell and Allen Householder, US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (2005, updated 2008). This resource outlines the unique risks associated with children using the internet. It also provides tips for parents on how to protect children, personal information, and personal technology.

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Privacy

Online Privacy and Safety Tips (1 p.) by NNEDV (2010). This brief fact sheet provides basic tips and information on posting personal content online. It encourages internet users to consider who may see the content and how much control over the information they will have.

Mobile Devices

Teens and Sexting (16 p.) by Amanda Lenhart, Pew Internet & American Life Project (2009). This report provides information on the prevalence of cell phone use among teenagers, as well as frequency and reasons for sending sexually explicit messages on their mobile devices.

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Social Networking and Media

 Cyber-Security Tip ST06-003: Staying Safe on Social Networking Sites (2 p.) by Mindi McDowell, US-CERT (2006, 2009). This resource provides basic information related to safe practices in the use of social networking sites. Tips include using stronger passwords and checking the site’s security settings. 

 Electronic Media and Youth Violence (24 p.) by Marci Feldman Hertz and Corinne David-Ferdman, CDC. This issue brief from the Center for Disease Control addresses the use and culture of electronic media for teens and young adults. The brief pays special attention to the use of electronic media, like email, blogging, and text messaging, in aggression and violence.

Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure, and Social (22 p.) by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (2010). This fact sheet provides information on what makes up a social networking site, as well as tips on safe social networking practices. It discusses the differences between private and public information on social networking sites and provides resources for further information.

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Video-Sharing

 I Tube, We Tube…they all scream for You Tube! (2 p.) by wiredsafety.org. This resource describes the rise of Video Networking in online culture. This link provides basic information on what Video Networking is, how it can be used, and some of the potential risks of using Video Networking sites.

Protect Your Computer, Your Family, and Yourself (33 slides) by Microsoft (2007). This PowerPoint Presentation provides information on online safety and security, discusses some basic risks, and protective factors. It includes notes for presenters.

Top 10 Safety Tips for Video-Sharing from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2008). This resource provides some basic tips for sharing videos online. It discusses the challenges of getting rid of videos that are posted due to Web archiving and lack of control over copying and forwarding once it is posted.

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Blogging

Blog Safety: Keeping Up with Your Child’s Online Social Life (10 p.) by Childnet International (2006-2007). This resource provides practical tips for parents on blogging and online social media. It provides brief explanations of the media and common words used to describe online activities, as well as suggested guidelines to teach children about internet safety.

Safety Tips on Blogging (1 p.) by Microsoft (2010). This resource provides basic safety tips on blogging. It addresses personal blogging safety, as well as tips for parent whose children keep a blog. 

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Internet Safety and Sexual ViolenceSome of the resources on internet safety are especially relevant to sexual violence. This section includes resources on abusive online behavior, child abuse and exploitation through technology, and information on safety planning. While some people use technology in a harmful way, many individuals and organizations use modern tools and media to get a positive message out into the world. 

 For those who have experienced violence or abuse

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse (5 p.) by Sarah Tucker (2005). This article discusses some of the positive and negatives ways that technology, the internet, and mobile devices may affect the lives of individuals who have experienced abuse. It also discusses resources that are available for people who have experienced digital abuse or stalking and how to raise awareness of the issue.

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse: Technology, Intimate Partner Stalking, and Advocacy (22 p.) by Cindy Southworth, Shawndell Dawson, Cynthia Fraser, and Sarah Tucker (2005). This research report offers information on use of technology in intimate partner abuse and what advocates can do to help someone who experiences this type of abusive behavior. The report includes safety planning tips and handouts.

A Thin Line: 2009 AP/MTV Digital Abuse Study (6 p.) by Janice Gatti, MTV and Associated Press (2009). The executive summary of a study conducted by MTV and the Associated Press delves into the prevalence of digital abuse, harassment and sexting among young people. The summary looks at these experiences and the responses to them.

Cyber Stalking and Harassment Basic Advice (online activity) by wiredsafety.org. This interactive resource provides some basic, beginning advice on how to deal with cyber stalking and harassment. It offers several different options for common issues faced online; participants can select the option that best describes their challenge and receive basic advice on how to proceed.

Technology Safety Planning with Survivors (1 p.) by The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) (2007-2010). This resources links to a page that provides information sheets on safety planning for technology use and abuse. The links on the page include resources in English (listed below), Spanish (listed below), Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Somali, and Russian.

Technology Safety Planning with Survivors (English Version) (1 p.) by NNEDV (2008). This sheet provides points to discuss with anyone you believe may be in danger or technology abuse. It specifically addresses individuals who have been affected by intimate partner violence, sexual violence, or stalking, but may be used to raise awareness as well.

Un Plan de Protección de la Tecnología par alas(os) Sobrevivientes (1 p.) by NNEDV (2008). This resource is the Spanish version of the fact sheet listed above. Proporciona puntos para discutir con alguien que cree que puede estar en peligro o el abuso de la tecnología. Se refiere específicamente a las personas que han sido afectados por la violencia infligida por la pareja, la violencia sexual o acecho, pero puede ser utilizado para aumentar la conciencia también.

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Child Abuse and Pornography Online

Child Pornography Possessors Arrested in Internet-Related Crimes: Findings From the National Juvenile Online Victimization Study (64 p.) by Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, and Kimberly J. Mitchell, funded by the U.S. Congress through a grant to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (2005). This research reports on the findings of a study of law-enforcement agencies nationwide and their findings and response to child pornography crimes.

Innocent Images (5 p.) the Federal Bureau of Investigations. This resource provides information and a history of the Innocent Images National Initiative to keep children from being sexually exploited online. It provides statistics on arrests and prosecutions of related cases and an overview of the issue.

Online “Predators” and their Victims: Myths, Realities and Implications for Prevention and Treatment (64 p.) by Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, Kimberly Mitchell, and Michele L. Ybarra (2008). This article provides information on the reality of sexual crimes on the internet, specifically addressing the impact of the media on beliefs about the dangers of the internet.

The National Strategy for Child Exploitation Prevention and Interdiction (280 p.) by the US Department of Justice (2010). This report to Congress addresses the issue of overcoming child exploitation. In addition to addressing exploitation over the internet through solicitation or producing and distributing child pornography, it also includes information on child sexual abuse and sex trafficking. 

Unwanted and Wanted Exposure to Online Pornography in a National Sample of Youth Internet Users (14 p.) by Janis Wolak, Kimberly Mitchell, & David Finkelhor (2007). This resource provides information based on a study of youth internet users who experienced exposure to online pornography. It discusses both wanted and unwanted exposure.

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Advocacy and Intervention through Technology

Social Networking & Privacy Tips for Domestic and Sexual Violence Programs (1 p.) by NNEDV (2010). This resource provides some basic information for domestic and sexual violence programs on maintaining privacy and confidentiality, as well as good practices for use of social networking sites in outreach and raising awareness.

Technology and Human Trafficking (28 p.) by UN Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking (2008). This background paper, intended to educate workshop participants on human trafficking basics, provides information on the impact of technology on trafficking in humans and the efforts to stop it.

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Safe Online Dating

Safer Dating Guidelines (3 p.) by True.com. This resource provides an overview of the policy held by an online dating site on screening for and reporting sex offenders. 

Safe and Successful Online Dating (web resource) by OnlineDatingSafetyTips.com. This page provides information and resources on various aspects of online dating, precautions to consider, and ways to reduce risk.

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Many of the resources on internet safety address issues of child safety and parent education. This section provides resources pertaining to parenting online, information specific to teenagers, and resources for primary-school-aged children.

For Parents and Caregivers

A Parent’s Guide to Internet Safety (7 p.) by U.S. DOJ Federal Bureau of Investigation. The FBI provides this pamphlet to help parents gain an understanding of internet safety issues for children. It discusses possible at-risk behaviors and situations, what a parent can do if they expect internet exploitation, and precautions that may help to reduce the risks. 

Be Smart on the Internet (1 p.) by Childnet International (2006). This resource links to a poster created to educate primary school-aged children on how to be internet SMART (Safe, Meeting, Accepting, Reliable, Tell). 

Blog Safety: Keeping Up with Your Child’s Online Social Life (10 p.) by Childnet International (2006-2007). This resource provides practical tips for parents on blogging and online social media. It provides brief explanations of the media and common words used to describe online activities, as well as suggested guidelines to teach children about internet safety.

Dealing with Cyberbullies (2 p.) by US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (2006, updated 2008). This resource provides information about cyberbullying and how to respond to online bullying behavior. 

Guide to Internet Terms: A Glossary by the Internet Education Foundation (1998-2008). This resource provides a glossary of internet terms in common use. 

Information and Online Resources (2 p.) by Childnet International (2009). This resource sheet provides brief descriptions and links to online resources for parents working to keep their children safe online. It includes resources on social networking, search engines, blogs, filters, and computer safety and security.

Keep in control (1 p.) by Childnet International (2006). This resource links to an educational poster aimed at secondary school-aged students. It provides basic tips for how to safely and appropriately use online media tools and protect basic safety.

Kids Virtual World Safety Tips from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2010). This resource provides a basic overview for parents on virtual worlds and avatars, including safety features, things to watch for, and how to talk with your kids about their virtual world play. It encourages parents to get involved and understand any tools or safety features in place on virtual world sites.

Protect Your Computer, Your Family, and Yourself (33 slides) by Microsoft (2007). This PowerPoint Presentation provides information on online safety and security, discusses some basic risks, and protective factors. It includes notes for presenters.

Safety Tips on Blogging (1 p.) by Microsoft (2010). This resource provides basic safety tips on blogging. It addresses personal blogging safety, as well as tips for parent whose children keep a blog.

Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure, and Social (3 p.) by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (2010). This fact sheet provides information on what makes up a social networking site, as well as tips on safe social networking practices. It discusses the differences between private and public information on social networking sites and provides resources for further information.

Social Networking Sites: A Parent’s Guide (4 p.) by the Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer Protection (2007). This resource provides information for parents on teaching their children how to safely use social networking sites. Additionally, it provides some basic online resources to refer to for help or more information.

Social Web Tips for Parents from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2009-2010). This resource provides basic information for parents on how to address social networking sites with their children. It advises that parents encourage critical thinking about what youth post online.

Teens and Sexting (16 p.) by Amanda Lenhart, Pew Internet & American Life Project (2009). This report provides information on the prevalence of cell phone use among teenagers, as well as frequency and reasons for sending sexually explicit messages on their mobile devices.

Tips to Help Stop Cyberbullying from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2009-2010). This fact sheet provides some basic tips on how to respond to and stop cyberbullying.

Tips to Prevent Sexting from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafetly.org (2009-2010). This resource sheet provides information for parents on preventing teens from sending sexually explicit messages using cell phones or the internet. It includes information on potential legal and personal repercussions and how to talk to teens about the issue.

US-CERT Cyber Security Tip ST05-002 – Keeping Children Safe Online (1 p.) by US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (2005, updated 2008). This resource outlines the unique risks associated with children using the internet. It also provides tips for parents on how to protect children, personal information, and personal technology.

Virtual World Tips for Parents of Teens from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2010). This resource provides basic information on what a virtual world is and how parents can be more involved in understanding their teens’ use of these sites. 

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For Teens

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse (5 p.) by Sarah Tucker (2005). This article discusses some of the positive and negatives ways that technology, the internet, and mobile devices may affect the lives of individuals who have experienced abuse. It also discusses resources that are available for people who have experienced digital abuse or stalking and how to raise awareness of the issue.

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse: Technology, Intimate Partner Stalking, and Advocacy (22 p.) by Cindy Southworth, Shawndell Dawson, Cynthia Fraser, and Sarah Tucker (2005). This research report offers information on use of technology in intimate partner abuse and what advocates can do to help someone who experiences this type of abusive behavior. The report includes safety planning tips and handouts.

Cyber-Security Tip ST06-003: Staying Safe on Social Networking Sites (2 p.) by Mindi McDowell, US-CERT (2006, 2009). This resource provides basic information related to safe practices in the use of social networking sites. Tips include using stronger passwords and checking the site’s security settings.

Cyber Stalking and Harassment Basic Advice (online activity) by wiredsafety.org. This interactive resource provides some basic, beginning advice on how to deal with cyber stalking and harassment. It offers several different options for common issues faced online; participants can select the option that best describes their challenge and receive basic advice on how to proceed.

Dealing with Cyberbullies (1 p.) by US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (2006, updated 2008). This resource provides information about cyberbullying and how to respond to online bullying behavior. 

 I Tube, We Tube…they all scream for You Tube! (2 p.) by wiredsafety.org. This resource describes the rise of Video Networking in online culture. This link provides basic information on what Video Networking is, how it can be used, and some of the potential risks of using Video Networking sites.

Keep in control (1 p.) by Childnet International (2006). This resource links to an educational poster aimed at secondary school-aged students. It provides basic tips for how to safely and appropriately use online media tools and protect basic safety.

Safety Tips on Blogging (1 p.) by Microsoft (2010). This resource provides basic safety tips on blogging. It addresses personal blogging safety, as well as tips for parent whose children keep a blog.

Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure, and Social (3 p.) by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (2010). This fact sheet provides information on what makes up a social networking site, as well as tips on safe social networking practices. It discusses the differences between private and public information on social networking sites and provides resources for further information.

Social Networking Sites: Safety Tips for Tweens and Teens (4 p.) by the Federal Trade Commission (2006). This resource provides safety tips for tweens and teens on safely using social networking sites.  It also provides additional resources.

Social Web Tips for Teens from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2008). This resource sheet provides tips for teens on using social networking and other media safely. It addresses online civility, cell phone use, in-person meetings, and using caution in making new friends and contacts online.

Tips to Help Stop Cyberbullying from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2009-2010). This fact sheet provides basic tips on how to respond to and stop cyberbullying.

Tips to Prevent Sexting from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafetly.org (2009-2010). This resource sheet provides information for parents on preventing teens from sending sexually explicit messages using cell phones or the internet. It includes information on potential legal and personal repercussions and how to talk to teens about the issue.

Top 10 Safety Tips for Video-Sharing from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2008). This resource provides basic tips for sharing videos online. It discusses the challenges of getting rid of videos that are posted due to Web archiving and lack of control over copying and forwarding once it is posted.

Top Secret (online game) by Common Sense Media and the Media Awareness Network (2010). This interactive game offers decision-making challenges around the use of social media and privacy. It is aimed at 6-8th grade students.

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For Kids

Be Smart on the Internet (1 p.) by Childnet International (2006). This resource links to a poster created to educate primary school-aged children on how to be internet SMART (Safe, Meeting, Accepting, Reliable, Tell). 

Children’s Bill of Rights for the Internet (1 p.) by ICRA, Childnet International, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, National Urban League, and Net-Mom (2002). This poster lists the rights a child has when using the internet, including safe and positive search results and the right not to feel guilty if something “icky” pops up on the screen. This resource emphasizes the right to ask questions and report strange behavior or content.

Dealing with Cyberbullies (1 p.) by US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (2006, updated 2008). This resource provides information and what cyberbullying is and how to respond to online bullying behavior. 

Kids Virtual World Safety Tips from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2010). This resource provides a basic overview for parents on virtual worlds and avatars, including safety features, things to watch for, and how to talk with your kids about their virtual world play. It encourages parents to get involved and understand any tools or safety features in place on virtual world sites.

Safety Land (Interactive Game) by AT&T. This interactive online game designed for kids teaches about safe internet habits. It also shares tips on how to avoid unwanted internet content.

Top Secret (online game) by Common Sense Media and the Media Awareness Network (2010). This interactive game offers decision-making challenges around the use of social media and privacy. It is aimed at 6-8th grade students.

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Internet Safety for Educators: Included in this section are resources for school and community educators to use in the classroom, tools for effectively using social media and networking sites, and information on how to prevent and intervene in cases of digital abuse.

Tools for the Classroom

Be Smart on the Internet (1 p.) by Childnet International (2006). This resource links to a poster created to educate primary school-aged children on how to be internet SMART (Safe, Meeting, Accepting, Reliable, Tell). 

Keep in control (1 p.) by Childnet International (2006). This resource links to an educational poster aimed at secondary school-aged students. It provides basic tips for how to safely and appropriately use online media tools and protect basic safety.

Safety Land (Interactive Game) by AT&T. This interactive online game designed for kids teaches about safe internet habits. It also shares tips on how to avoid unwanted internet content.

Top Secret (online game) by Common Sense Media and the Media Awareness Network (2010). This interactive game offers decision-making challenges around the use of social media and privacy. It is aimed at 6-8th grade students. 

Back to the top

Using Social Media

The Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit (61 p.) by CDC Office of the Associate Director for Communication (2010). This resource guide provides information and general overviews of various social media and social networking sites and applications to help health educators understand and use these technological communication tools. It provides examples of a social media campaign, resources, and communication strategy worksheets.

Prevention and Intervention of Abuse in the Classroom

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse (5 p.) by Sarah Tucker (2005). This article discusses some of the positive and negatives ways that technology, the internet, and mobile devices may affect the lives of individuals who have experienced abuse. It also discusses resources that are available for people who have experienced digital abuse or stalking and how to raise awareness of the issue.

A Thin Line: 2009 AP/MTV Digital Abuse Study (6 p.) by Janice Gatti, MTV and Associated Press (2009). The executive summary of a study conducted by MTV and the Associated Press delves into the prevalence of digital abuse, harassment and sexting among young people. The summary looks at these experiences and the responses to them.

Protect Your Computer, Your Family, and Yourself (33 slides) by Microsoft (2007). This PowerPoint Presentation provides information on online safety and security, discusses some basic risks, and protective factors. It includes notes for presenters.

Teens and Sexting (16 p.) by Amanda Lenhart, Pew Internet & American Life Project (2009). This report provides information on the prevalence of cell phone use among teenagers, as well as frequency and reasons for sending sexually explicit messages on their mobile devices.

Tips to Help Stop Cyberbullying from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2009-2010). This fact sheet provides some basic tips on how to respond to and stop cyberbullying.

Tips to Prevent Sexting from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2009-2010). This resource sheet provides information for parents on preventing teens from sending sexually explicit messages using cell phones or the internet. It includes information on potential legal and personal repercussions and how to talk to teens about the issue.

Back to the top

Internet Safety for Advocates: This section provides online tools for advocates working to prevent, intervene, or help individuals healing from sexual violence. It includes some information on digital abuse issues, resources that discuss online counseling, and tools for using social media.

Prevention, Intervention, and Advocacy

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse: Technology, Intimate Partner Stalking, and Advocacy (22 p.) by Cindy Southworth, Shawndell Dawson, Cynthia Fraser, and Sarah Tucker (2005). This research report offers information on use of technology in intimate partner abuse and what advocates can do to help someone who experiences this type of abusive behavior. The report includes safety planning tips and handouts.

The Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit (61 p.) by CDC Office of the Associate Director for Communication (2010). This resource guide provides information and general overviews of various social media and social networking sites and applications to help health educators understand and use these technological communication tools. It provides examples of a social media campaign, resources, and communication strategy worksheets.

Technology Safety Planning with Survivors (1 p.) by The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) (2007-2010). This resources links to a page that provides information sheets on safety planning for technology use and abuse. The links on the page include resources in English (listed below), Spanish (listed below), Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Somali, and Russian.

Technology Safety Planning with Survivors (English Version) (1 p.) by NNEDV (2008). This sheet provides points to discuss with anyone you believe may be in danger of technology abuse. It specifically addresses individuals who have been affected by intimate partner violence, sexual violence, or stalking, but may be used to raise awareness as well.

 Un Plan de Protección de la Tecnología par alas(os) Sobrevivientes (1 p.) by NNEDV (2008). This resource is the Spanish version of the fact sheet listed above. Proporciona puntos para discutir con alguien que cree que puede estar en peligro o el abuso de la tecnología. Se refiere específicamente a las personas que han sido afectados por la violencia infligida por la pareja, la violencia sexual o acecho, pero puede ser utilizado para aumentar la conciencia también.

Social Networking & Privacy Tips for Domestic and Sexual Violence Programs (1 p.) by NNEDV (2010). This resource provides some basic information for domestic and sexual violence programs on maintain privacy and confidentiality, as well as good practices for use of social networking sites in outreach and raising awareness.

Back to the top

Online Counseling

Practical Aspects of Online Counseling: Ethics, Training, Technology, and Competency (43 p.) by Michael J. Mallon, David L. Vogel, and Aaron B. Rochlen (2005). This resource reports on the practical and ethical utility of counseling clients online. The authors discuss what training and supervision would be like for online counseling.

Providing Counseling Online: Because We “Can,” Should We? (10 p.) by Pamela K.S. Patrick (2006). This brief paper discusses the ethical and practical dilemmas of providing online counseling services to clients. 

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Social Media and Violence

A Thin Line: 2009 AP/MTV Digital Abuse Study (6 p.) by Janice Gatti, MTV and Associated Press (2009). The executive summary of a study conducted by MTV and the Associated Press delves into the prevalence of digital abuse, harassment and sexting among young people. The summary looks at these experiences and the responses to them.

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse (5 p.) by Sarah Tucker (2005). This article discusses some of the positive and negatives ways that technology, the internet, and mobile devices may affect the lives of individuals who have experienced abuse. It also discusses resources that are available for people who have experienced digital abuse or stalking and how to raise awareness of the issue.

Child Pornography Possessors Arrested in Internet-Related Crimes: Findings From the National Juvenile Online Victimization Study (64 p.) by Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, and Kimberly J. Mitchell, funded by the U.S. Congress through a grant to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (2005). This research reports on the findings of a study of law-enforcement agencies nationwide and their findings and response to child pornography crimes.

Electronic Media and Youth Violence (24 p.) by Marci Feldman Hertz and Corinne David-Ferdman, CDC. This issue brief from the Centers for Disease Control addresses the use and culture of electronic media for teens and young adults. The brief pays special attention to the use of electronic media, like email, blogging, and text messaging, in aggression and violence.

Teens and Sexting (16 p.) by Amanda Lenhart, Pew Internet & American Life Project (2009). This report provides information on the prevalence of cell phone use among teenagers, as well as frequency and reasons for sending sexually explicit messages on their mobile devices.

Online “Predators” and their Victims: Myths, Realities and Implications for Prevention and Treatment (64 p.) by Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, Kimberly Mitchell, and Michele L. Ybarra (2008). This article provides information on the reality of sexual crimes on the internet, specifically addressing the impact of the media on beliefs about the dangers of the internet.

Back to the top

Digital Abuse: The term digital abuse encompasses many of the ways that technology can be used to harm, harass, or inflict violence on others. Three terms especially relevant to digital abuse have had major attention online, in the news, and in society recently: cyberbullying, cyberstalking, and sexting. Information on these issues is available here. 

Online Safety Issues

A Thin Line: 2009 AP/MTV Digital Abuse Study (6 p.) by Janice Gatti, MTV and Associated Press (2009). The executive summary of a study conducted by MTV and the Associated Press delves into the prevalence of digital abuse, harassment and sexting among young people. The summary looks at these experiences and the responses to them.

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse (5 p.) by Sarah Tucker (2005). This article discusses some of the positive and negatives ways that technology, the internet, and mobile devices may affect the lives of individuals who have experienced abuse. It also discusses resources that are available for people who have experienced digital abuse or stalking and how to raise awareness of the issue.

Child Pornography Possessors Arrested in Internet-Related Crimes: Findings From the National Juvenile Online Victimization Study (64 p.) by Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, and Kimberly J. Mitchell, funded by the U.S. Congress through a grant to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (2005). This research reports on the findings of a study of law-enforcement agencies nationwide and their findings and response to child pornography crimes.

Electronic Media and Youth Violence (24 p.) by Marci Feldman Hertz and Corinne David-Ferdman, CDC. This issue brief from the Centers for Disease Control addresses the use and culture of electronic media for teens and young adults. The brief pays special attention to the use of electronic media, like email, blogging, and text messaging, in aggression and violence.

Online Threats to Youth: Solicitation, Harassment, and Problematic Content (80 p.) by Andrew Schrock and danah boyd (2008). This resource offers a review of literature on internet safety. It seeks to answer questions about the threats faced by youth online, which youth are most at risk, and how threats may be interrelated.

Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure, and Social (3 p.) by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (2010). This fact sheet provides information on what makes up a social networking site, as well as tips on safe social networking practices. It discusses the differences between private and public information on social networking sites and provides resources for further information.

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Cyberbullying, Cyberstalking, and Sexting

A High-Tech Twist on Abuse: Technology, Intimate Partner Stalking, and Advocacy (22 p.) by Cindy Southworth, Shawndell Dawson, Cynthia Fraser, and Sarah Tucker (2005). This research report offers information on use of technology in intimate partner abuse and what advocates can do to help someone who experiences this type of abusive behavior. The report includes safety planning tips and handouts.

Cyber Stalking and Harassment Basic Advice (online activity) by wiredsafety.org. This interactive resource provides some basic, beginning advice on how to deal with cyber stalking and harassment. It offers several different options for common issues faced online; participants can select the option that best describes their challenge and will get some basic advice on how to proceed.

Dealing with Cyberbullies (1 p.) by US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (2006, updated 2008). This resource provides information about cyberbullying and how to respond to online bullying behavior. 

Teens and Sexting (16 p.) by Amanda Lenhart, Pew Internet & American Life Project (2009). This report provides information on the prevalence of cell phone use among teenagers, as well as frequency and reasons for sending sexually explicit messages on their mobile devices.

Tips to Help Stop Cyberbullying from ConnectSafely.org (1 p.) by ConnectSafely.org (2009-2010). This fact sheet provides some basic tips on how to respond to and stop cyberbullying.

Tips to Prevent Sexting from ConnectSafely.org (2 p.) by ConnectSafetly.org (2009-2010). This resource sheet provides information for parents on preventing teens from sending sexually explicit messages using cell phones or the internet. It includes information on potential legal and personal repercussions and how to talk to teens about the issue.

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Childnet International: “Childnet International’s mission is to work in partnership with others around the world to help make the Internet a great and safe place for children.”

Connect Safely |Connect Safely | Online Safety 3.0 - on and off the fixed and mobile Internet: “ConnectSafely is for parents, teens, educators, advocates - everyone engaged in and interested in the impact of the social Web. The user-driven, all-media, multi-platform, fixed and mobile social Web is a big part of young people's lives, and this is the central space – linked to from social networks across the Web - for learning about safe, civil use of Web 2.0 together.”

GetNetWise | You're one click away : “GetNetWise is a public service brought to you by Internet industry corporations and public interest organizations to help ensure that Internet users have safe, constructive, and educational or entertaining online experiences. The GetNetWise coalition wants Internet users to be just "one click away" from the resources they need to make informed decisions about their and their family's use of the Internet.”

The Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit (61 p.) by CDC Office of the Associate Director for Communication (2010). This resource guide provides information and general overviews of various social media and social networking sites and applications to help health educators understand and use these technological communication tools. It provides examples of a social media campaign, resources, and communication strategy worksheets.

Stop Cyberbullying: Provides interactive resources and information available for download to aid in education, outreach and advocacy related to cyberbullying.

Teen Angels: “Teenangels are a group of thirteen to eighteen year old volunteers that have been specially trained in all aspects of online safety, privacy and security. After completion of the required training, the Teenangels run unique programs in schools to spread the word about responsible and safe surfing to other teens and younger kids, parents, and teachers.”

Wired Safety: “Together with our affiliate, www.wiredcops.org, specially-trained volunteers patrol the Internet looking for child pornography, child molesters and cyberstalkers. We also offer a wide variety of educational and help services to the internet community at large. Other volunteers find and review family-friendly Web sites, filter software products and Internet services.”

 

 

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