This Bureau of Justice Statistics report includes results from the second  National Inmate Survey (NIS-2) which includes data from 167 state and federal prisons, 286 jails, and 10 special confinement facilities operated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the U.S. Military, and correctional authorities in Indian country. It was administered to 81,566 inmates ages 18 or older. The report includes information on prevalence, circumstances surrounding victimization, facility rankings and variations based on gender, race, educational background, sexual orientation and previous sexual victimization.  4.4% of prison inmates and 3.1% of jail inmates reported one or more incidents of sexual victimization.

In 2008, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center partnered with the Victims Rights Law Center, National Sexual Assault Coalition Resource Sharing Project, Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault, University of New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania Community Legal Services to develop and conduct a national survey on housing and sexual violence.  This report provides a summary of key survey findings and policy recommendations.

This overview is part of the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. The packet also includes: the National Survey of Advocates on Sexual Violence, Housing, and the Violence Against Women Act; a fact sheet; a research brief; an online resource collection; a technical assistance bulletin; and an advocate's guide to housing and sexual violence.

This reports documents hate-motivated violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people in 2009 in the United States as reported to member organizations of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP). It includes statistics, trends, narratives and responses and recommendations for change.

 
This report presents baseline information on pregnancies, births, sexual history and behavior, contraceptive use, non-voluntary sex, and unintended pregnancy among urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women nationwide.

Foundations play a critical role in supporting efforts to address gender-based violence, yet little research has been conducted on the level or type of funding in the U.S. Spurred by the paucity of data and analysis, the Ms. Foundation for Women undertook a multi-pronged study to measure the scope, focus and impact of funding in this area. Coinciding with the 15th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, this report reviews the progress foundations have made in addressing gender based violence in order to sketch the current philanthropic landscape and its potential for growth.

This National Institute of Justice Special Report addresses the question of why backlogs of DNA evidence awaiting testing persist even after the federal government has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to eliminate them. Answering this question requires understanding both what a backlog is and how backlogs can be reduced; this report provides that understanding. (NCJ 230183)

This report provides a review of innovative policy options for the management of sexual offenders.

This report, the product of a 2009 survey of victim assistance providers and LGBTQ anti-violence programs throughout the United States, describes widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime and recommends steps to improve both the services and their accessibility.
 

This report documents women’s experiences of harassment, financial control, control over their course and institution choices, stalking, violence, and sexual assault.

Using 2007 National Crime Victimization Survey data, BJS estimates that about one third (34%) of the crimes against persons with or without a disability in 2007 were serious violent crimes (rape/sexual assault, robbery, or aggravated assault). Persons with disabilities were victims of about 47,000 rapes.  Rates of rape and sexual assault were more than twice those for people without disabilities. Youth with a disability ages 12 to 19 experienced violence at nearly twice the rate as those without a disability. People with cognitive disabilities had a higher risk of violent victimization than persons with any other type of disability. Nearly 1 in 5 violent crime victims with a disability believed that they became a victim because of their disability.

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