This white paper discusses the sexuality and reproductive health of youth in the digital age.  According to the report, youth, ages 13-24, use technology as a means of exploring health related issues and well-being.  It include technology usage patterns and practical recommendations for working with youth to increase sexual health and literacy.

This report discusses research and knowledge on sexual abusers and sex offenders, including the history of public knowledge around child sexual abuse.  It includes information on preventing child sexual abuse through evidence-based and community informed sex offender policy. 

See the report online.

This publication is provided as a starting point for professional organizations and educational institutions to prepare their helping professionals, including doctors, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and beyond, to develop the skills and competencies needed to meet the needs of individuals who may have experienced abuse and violence.

This report discusses the value and benefits of rethinking violence prevention.  It suggests an approach that identifies and deconstructs root causes of violence.  Of particular interest in this report is the discussion of the predictability of violence on a community or population wide level.

View the full report.

This technical research report explores the prevalence, context, response, reactions and reporting of various forms of sexual violence on historically black college and university campuses.  This research was conducted in an effort to close current gaps in the literature in this topic area.

Read the full technical report and summary.

This 48-page report includes information from Human Rights Watch on violations of migrants’ rights in 2010 includes coverage of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. Many countries rely on migrant workers to fill labor shortages in low-paying, dangerous, and poorly regulated jobs. Human Rights Watch documented labor exploitation and barriers to redress for migrants in agriculture, domestic work, and construction in Indonesia, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States. Immigration sponsorship systems in many countries give employers immense control over workers and lead to migrants being trapped in abusive situations or unable to pursue redress through the justice system. Sexual abuse of female migrants and trafficking victims has also been documented.

The report provides a framework for capturing the magnitude and scope of gender-based disparities and tracking their progres by providing benchmarks of national gender gaps on economic, political, education- and health-based criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups, and over time. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them.

This report illustrates the results of a cross-national study based on in-depth interviews from both experts and average Americans on Sexual Violence. This study, supported by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center comprises the following three components: 1) an analysis of the discourse on sexual violence from expert interviews, 2) one-on-one cognitive interviews with Americans, and 3) a comparative analysis that “maps the gaps” between expert and lay understandings of this topic. The report concludes with a set of recommendations that will improve communications practice around this issue and inform future research.

Read more about the partnership between NSVRC and Frameworks Institute.

This nationwide survey, which included more than 1,000 girls ages 14 to 17, finds the increased exposure to social media puts teenage girls in a confusing situation where a girl's image is not always what it seems, as nearly 74 percent of girls agree that most girls use social networking sites to make themselves "cooler than they really are." The survey finds that girls downplay several positive characteristics of themselves online, most prominently their intelligence, kindness and efforts to be a positive influence.

These feelings among others related to emotional safety online and the impact of social media on girls' relationships are further spelled out in the Who's That Girl factsheet (PDF).

The 2009 survey of 7,261 middle and high school students found that at school nearly 9 out of 10 LGBT students experienced harassment at school in the past year and nearly two-thirds felt unsafe because of their sexual orientation. Nearly a third of LGBT students skipped at least one day of school in the past month because of safety concerns.

An analysis of National School Climate Survey data over 10 years showed that since 1999 there has been a decreasing trend in the frequency of hearing homophobic remarks; however, LGBT students' experiences with more severe forms of bullying and harassment have remained relatively constant.

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