The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

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Browse by topics or publication types for select online resources or click here to search our entire Library collection of print and electronic materials.  If you cannot find what you need, please go to the general technical assistance section to make a request.

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The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 requires that sexual assault victims must not be required to file law enforcement reports in order to receive free exams. This study examined how states are meeting these goals. It found that victim compensation funds are by far the largest funder of exams across the country. In the 19 jurisdictions included in case studies, victims generally received free exams without having to report if they did not want to. However, barriers to even accessing the exam prevent some victims from seeking help.

Read full report.

Download June 12, 2014 Webinar Powerpoint Slides

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The 2014 Spring & Summer edition of The Resource features a cover story on campus sexual assault written by the Clery Center For Security On Campus. The article provides details on recent amendments to the Jeanne Cleary Act and how policy can be used to help protect the well-being of students. In the same vein, The University of Oregon has students talking about consent with its SexPositive cellphone app, which has been downloaded more than 10,000 times.

Other topics covered in this issue include the 20th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, how to protect victims’ privacy when electronic evidence is introduced, and a reflection on three years of healthy sexuality as the theme of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

Does taking a sabbatical sound like a good idea? Read about one executive director’s three-month getaway . Looking for a creative way to fundraise? Check out a vanity license plate campaign from Virginia that has been raising money to prevent sexual and domestic violence.

Learn about sexual assault prevention efforts in Pennsylvania, New York, and New Hampshire. See snapshots from Love146’s Sweet Relief Benefit Bakeoff, an event that combined treats and information about fighting human trafficking on Valentine’s Day.

Oppressive factors make LGBT people more likely to be in confinement, and more likely to experience abuse there. This toolkit covers the basics of advocating for the rights of LGBT prisoners, tips on Working with facilities), policy considerations, and combatting the incarceration of LGBT people.

This report is the first set of action steps and recommendations released by the White House regarding sexual assault on campus.

Did you know there’s a link between sexual violence and housing? Sexual violence can jeopardize a person’s housing. Lack of housing or inadequate shelter can increase the risk for sexual violence. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 10 percent of women and 8 percent men who experienced housing insecurity in the past year had a higher prevalence of intimate partner violence. This infographic explores the intersections between housing and sexual violence. For more information on this topic, download the Housing and Sexual Violence Information Packet. (see references) Housing-infographic-cover

INFOGRAPHIC REFERENCES
Housing insecurity and intimate partner violence
Breiding, M. J., Chen J., & Black, M. C. (2014). Intimate partner violence in the United States — 2010. Retrieved from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/cdc_nisvs_ipv_report_2013_v17_...

Assaults in the home
Colombino, N., Mercado, C. C., & Jeglic, E. L. (2009). Situational aspects of sexual offending: Implications for residence restriction laws. Justice
Research and Policy, 11, 27-43. doi:10.3818/JRP.11.2009.27

Youth leaving home
Cray, A., Miller, K., & Durso, L. E. (2013). Seeking shelter: The experiences and unmet needs of LGBT homeless youth. Retrieved from the Center
for American Progress: http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/LGBTHomelessY...

Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania: http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

Victims relocating
Keeley, T. (2006). Landlord sexual assault and rape of tenants: Survey findings and advocacy approaches. Clearinghouse Review: Journal of
Poverty Law and Policy, 40 (7-8), 441-450.

Witnessing an assault
Kipke, M., Simon, T., Montgomery, S., Unger, J., & Iverson, E. (1997). Homeless youth and their exposure to and involvement in violence
while living on the streets. Journal of Adolescent Health, 20, 360-367. doi:10.1016/S1054-139X(97)00037-2

Victims of physical or sexual violence
Kushel, M. B., Evans, J. L., Perry, S., Robertson, M. J., & Moss, A.R. (2003). No door to lock: Victimization among homeless and
marginally housed persons. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163, 2492-2499. doi:10.1001/archinte.163.20.2492

Commercial sexual exploitation
Estes, R., & Weiner, N. (2001). Commercial sexual exploitation of children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Retrieved from the University
of Pennsylvania. http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/restes/CSEC_Files/Complete_CSEC_020220.pdf

 

Every April, our Nation comes together to renew our stand against a crime that affronts our basic decency and humanity. Sexual assault threatens every community in America, and we all have a role to play in protecting those we love most -- our mothers and fathers, our husbands and wives, our daughters and sons. During National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, we recommit to ending the outrage of sexual assault, giving survivors the support they need to heal, and building a culture that never tolerates sexual violence.

Read entire proclamation.

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