The NSVRC collects information and resources to assist those working to prevent sexual violence and to improve resources, outreach and response strategies. This resource section includes access to NSVRC collections and selected online resources.

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The serial perpetration hypothesis — which suggests that a small number of men perpetrate the vast majority of rapes, and that these men perpetrate multiple rapes over time — has played an important role in the field of rape prevention as a model of sexual violence, especially raising awareness of rapists who have not been identified by the criminal justice system. A 2015 study published in JAMA Pediatrics, A Trajectory Analysis of the Campus Serial Rapist Assumption, raises questions about the serial perpetrator hypothesis.

Although it is clear that a subset of perpetrators do commit multiple acts of rape over time, the research suggests that most perpetrators do not chronically offend over time. Instead, perpetrators are much more heterogeneous in terms of their risk factors, methods of coercion, and pattern of offending over time.

 

Powerpoint Handout to support National Sexual Assault Conference Workshop: Assessments that Unite

Esta guía está diseñada para los Intercesores/as  de programas de agresion sexual que trabajan con los padres sin ofender y / o cuidadores de niños que han sufrido asalto sexual. Las sugerencias y estrategias están destinadas para su uso con los niños bajo la edad de 13 años.

En inglés

 

The publication provides frameworks and examples of prevention work that supports healthy development, protective factors, and resiliency in children, families, and communities. It begins by providing a look into the complimentary field of research and ground work in childhood development and trauma. Next we delve into two nuanced topics: child sexual abuse in Latin@ communities and addressing sexual development for children. The following articles spotlight a new resource tool and the pilot project supported across the state of Washington. It concludes with a Question Oppression and Resources section to help further the conversation about consent.

Partners in Social Change is published by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs Prevention Resource Center from its office in Olympia, Washington.The focus of this publication is to present information and resources for the prevention of sexual violence, with a special emphasis on social change.

This report exposes the ways in which we criminalize girls in the United States— especially girls of color — who have been sexually and physically abused, and it offers policy recommendations to dismantle the abuse to prison pipeline. It illustrates the pipeline with examples, including the detention of girls who are victims of sex trafficking, girls who run away or become truant because of abuse they experience, and girls who cross into juvenile justice from the child welfare system. By illuminating both the problem and potential solutions, the authors hope to make the first step toward ending the cycle of victimization-to-imprisonment for marginalized girls.

Esta traducción resume los principales hallazgos del estudio “La victimización de Violencia Sexual y de las asociaciones de la salud en una muestra de la comunidad de las mujeres hispanas,” realizado por K. C. Basile, S.G. Smith, M.L. Walters, D.N. Fowler, K. Hawk y M.E. Hamburger. Los hallazgos del estudio se basan en nuestra comprensión de los efectos de la violencia sexual en mujeres latinas y pueden orientar nuestras estrategias tanto de prevención de la violencia sexual como de respuesta a ésta.

En inglés.

Sexual violence can result in many health, economic, and social struggles in the lives of survivors. This resource highlights findings from a 2015 study on sexual violence against Latina women. Findings can help strengthen our prevention and response strategies with Latin@ communities. In
Spanish.

This toolkit provides resources and support to build language access as a core service for survivors with LEP. The tabs at the top link to:

  • A step-by-step process for developing your first written Language Access Plan, and a guide to critical conversations to enhance an existing Language Access Plan.
  • Tools to help you establish your program’s language access standards and make them part of your program’s day-to-day work, such as language skill assessments, interpreter code of ethics and confidentiality forms, and multilingual materials (I Speak cards, translated materials, etc.).
  • These are management tools your program may use regularly; and direct advocacy tools for use by and with survivors with LEP.
  • Descriptions and analysis of specific language access strategies such as language identification and interpreter services.
  • Support to help you advocate for language access services throughout the community: training curriculum and systems advocacy guidance.
  • Resources, such as federal law and guidance, sample plans, and promising practices to help you shape your efforts. These are informational resources you may need to build your own Language Access Plan and for systems advocacy.

 

To contribute to the dissemination of new brain research as it applies to those
serving children and youth, Child Trends invited Jane Roskams, Ph.D., a leading
neuroscientist and executive director of strategy and alliances at the Allen
Institute for Brain Science, to speak. Dr Roskams is a long-standing researcher
in the field of brain repair and epigenetics. She revealed new developments
in our understanding of how the brain grows and learns, and how it adapts
to its environment and trauma. Following her presentation, Dr. Kristin Moore,
Child Trends’ senior scholar and past president, moderated a discussion on the
practical implications of shifting views on brain development and resiliency. The
discussion aimed to inform programs and policies that affect young people,
particularly at-risk children. It featured two repondents: Daniel Cardinali,
President of Communities In Schools, the nation's largest drop-out prevention
program; and Dianna Walters of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative.
This research brief summarizes their presentations.

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