What motivated you to become an “Engaged Bystander”?
In college, a woman I dated shared with me that she had been abused by a previous boyfriend. Another told me she had been coerced into having sex. Hearing about that, and hearing about what it meant to be female, especially from someone I really cared about, opened my eyes. 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  This is Part II of my interview with Jackson Katz
 
Joan: What is your vision for creating that institutional change?
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander: I know that to really change our culture around bystander enagement, we can not do it alone. In fact, it makes no sense for me to write about bystander engagement in isolation – it violates the very spirit and values we need to break the isolation of sexual violence. So I have been looking for ways to have other voices in this blog and this week, I wanted to feature the new blog by BARCC (the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center).  The video blog about racism make an essential point for our movement as well. 

Undefined

This is a post script to our Letters to an Engaged Bystander Blog and a guest blog by Sally J. Laskey, NSVRC Director of Special Projects. To check out   Joan Tabachnick's continued work follow her on twitter @engagebystander.

English

Dear Engaged Bystander: Two seemingly unrelated facts about me: I am a huge fan of primary prevention. And I am a Yelp-er. I rely on the consumer-review website for guidance about the best tailor in my neighborhood to where I can unfailingly find delicious ravioli or patio dining.

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  I’m all for the bystander approach and it seems as if the bystander strategy has taken a firm hold in the violence prevention field. I see many merits of the approach including reducing defensiveness in our conversations with men and boys, giving tools to address and interrupt problematic behaviors and attitudes on the spectrum of violence and empowering individuals to see themselves as part of a community response to violence.   Wherever we have tried using the bystander approach there have been important shifts in our communities towards holding perpetrators acco

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander: This is the last of 3 postings by Meg Stone.  Thank you Meg for the guest blog postings! 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander: I am thrilled to announce that Meg Stone has agreed to be our first guest blogger next week. For those of you who may not know her, Meg is the executive director of IMPACT self defense.

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander. I know that being an engaged bystander is not easy. We address issues many people would rather ignore. We have to communicate with enough self-assuredness that we are not dismissed and simultaneously approach challenging conversations with warmth and flexibility so that people feel supported and motivated to change.
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  I had a wonderful opportunity to talk with Alan Berkowitz to learn more about what he is focusing his work towards these days.  If you don't know of Alan, he is an internationally recognized expert on bystander behavior, violence prevention and social justice issues; author of Response Ability:  A Complete Guide to Bystander Intervention; and always an inspiration to talk with. 

Undefined

Pages

Subscribe to Guest Blog