Dear Engaged Bystander: You may have this experience too. When you do this work, friends and family call to talk about situations they face with their kids and often ask for advice. My brother who is a family practice doctor has the same experience… 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  I believe that our leaders need to model how to step in, they need to actively acknowledge the everyday heroes in our lives, and they have to call out the people who decide to do nothing. 
 
What would that look like? 
 

Undefined
Dear Engaged Bystander:  Listening to stories is my passion – I learn so much from hearing how people cope, how people change, and I am especially moved by the strength and courage it takes to emerge into a new life after experiencing profound trauma. Stories are the way that people make sense of themselves and their world (Shannon, 1995). Throughout my career in prevention, I had the privilege of hearing hundreds of stories from families and friends who cared deeply enough to reach out for help. These are the stories that I carry wit
Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  With only one week to go in my blogging, I wanted to reflect back on some issues and articles I missed along the way.  Do you ever wish you had said something but didn't?  Well, there is one article that has stuck in my mind for a while now. A letter to the Ethicist appeared in the NY Times Magazine section a few weeks ago
 
Here is the letter and the response: 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystanders: I am fascinated with stories. In high school we had to learn about Greek mythology and I learned about the power of storytelling. Centuries later (or am I just feeling old), we still have a sense of how this ancient culture thought about love, life, and war. Storytelling is how one generation teaches values to the next. 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged bystander:  I absolutely believe that ALL of us have many bystander stories to tell. In fact, if we interact with people every day, we have a story would could tell every single day. If we look at a time in our lives where we were being teased, sexually harassed or worse and someone did something – there is a story to tell. Or if we look at a time in our lives where we saw someone else who was uncomfortable or teased, sexually harassed or worse and we said something or did something to stop what was going on – there is a story to tell. 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  The Merriam Webster definition of a bystander is: “one present, but not taking part in a situation or event: a chance spectator.” When I read this definition, it implies that we can watch an event and not be affected by it. Even the term, “bystander apathy” implies that people can watch and then choose not act because they don’t care. I believe that people care deeply stopping sexual violence and are deeply affected by what they see -- even if they choose not to act. 
 

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  I am not someone who watches a lot of TV, but this new program, "What Would You Do?" fascinates me.  The premise of the ABC "News" Program is that they have various situations played by actors and then see how people react.  There are a number of scenarios that are well worth watching:

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander: When I give talks, I think that the hardest concept to get across is that our current frame for decision-making is wrong. Talk with anyone who sees something that makes them uncomfortable (e.g., a man pushing against a woman breasts in a NYC subway or a neighbor taking pictures of all the young girls at the public pool) and the decision they are trying to make is “to do something or do nothing”.  I think that when we are uncomfortable, we need to decide WHAT is the best and safest thing for me to do in this situation. And there are hundreds of actions we can take in

Undefined

Dear Engaged Bystander:  I read a wonderful quote recently about the importance of stories:
 
“Telling stories is as basic to human beings as eating. More so, in fact, for while food makes us live, stories are what make our lives worth living.”

Undefined

Pages

Subscribe to Stories