A lot of people have asked me about how social media can be used to benefit SANE and other victim service programs. People feel very intimidated by the process, which is a shame, because I think it's an incredibly approachable and democratic tool. And I think we could harness its broad appeal and reach to allow for not just awareness and fundraising campaigns, but also recruitment efforts. If anyone's using social media to help with recruitment I'd love to hear from you!
 

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Many people are creating their own trainings as a way to add staff and/or maintain team competency. If you're looking to implement your own educational programs (or just want to fine tune the ones you already have running), consider checking out the National Victim Assistance Academy's guide, The Ultimate Educator (OVC) and its fantastic chapter on Adult Learning (PDF).

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Sometimes it's the simple tools that can make a big impact. Take for instance the Decision Selection Matrix (PDF) from Performance Vistas. I talk a lot about prioritizing resources and energy expenditures (particularly for those of you without a lot of compensated hours for running programs), and this is another one of those small things (it's only a page!) that can have a big impact.
 
Per the authors:

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I am dashing off to the airport to catch a flight to Philadelphia, so I have only a moment for a quick post. But I wanted to point yor attention to this great piece on having difficult conversations. It makes me think about the kinds of conflict that sometimes flair up when we work collaboratively as part of a SART or MDT.

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I will be presenting on sustainability here at EVAW this morning, and one of the areas of focus will be the nexus of nursing leadership and staff retention. I've always said that when looking for guidance for effective recruiting, a lot of the nursing literature isn't relevant, because the role of SANE has so many elements of volunteerism (both figuratively and literally) that the nonprofit literature's often a better fit. However, when it comes to retention, the nursing literature's right on the money.

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I had a reader ask for some basic resources on emergency contraception. Specifically information supporting the argument for using Plan B (a more expensive medication) over Ovral or other combined oral contraceptive pills (which cost pennies). The reader mentioned that from a sustainability perspective, doesn't it make sense to go with the cheaper medication?
 

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I am thrilled to finally have a bit of bandwidth at my disposal now that I am laying over in the Amsterdam airport. So just a quickie for you before my flight boards for Washington--this from our colleagues in the EMS community. EMS Magazine had an article on employee retention in their October 2007 edition (updated in July 2008), and I thought it was interesting how many of their suggestions apply to us, as well.

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Because so many of us are slogging through long hours and huge case loads, particularly in this economic climate, I thought this piece from Rosabeth Moss Kanter over at the Voices blog (Harvard Business Publishing) would be particularly relevant. In her post, she discusses the 3 characteristics that make someone an energizer.

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Fieldstone Alliance just released their latest (and last) chart in a recent series on cushioning yourself against the economic downturn. They describe the chart as a review of engagement strategies, but in simpler terms, its a look at how programs can work with their communities, the agencies within their communities, as well as with each other, to get through the tough times.
 

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Good morning from beautiful Newport, RI!
 

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