Friday Q&A with Karen Carroll

Many of you would recognize Karen Carroll if you saw her. She makes an appearance in the DOJ SART video, and she is your guide to the medical forensic exam on the Virtual Practicum. What makes her a standout in my mind, however, is that she is the biggest cheerleader for forensic nursing I know. Her passion for the work is infectious, and you know how much she loves what she does the minute you meet her. So I am particularly pleased to be able to share her insights with you on this drizzly, chilly morning here in the 216:
 
I’ve been a SANE since: May of 1997

Hospital or community-based program? 1997-2005 community based as the Westchester County SANE Program Coordinator.  2005 to present as Associate Director of Bronx SART Program

I’m a SANE because: I had to teach a doctor how to do my own evidence collection after I was raped in 1994.  If I could do my own, I could certainly learn to do this for my patients.

The best advice someone ever gave me was:
You CAN do anything you want. ( I was 15 and pregnant)

A skill every SANE should have is:
compassion

A skill every program coordinator should have is: patience

More money or more staff? Tough choice.  As I move towards enough staff, I would love it if my Examiners were paid more money.

I wish someone had told me when I was first starting out: To learn about budgets and grant writing

My most indispensable resource is: the IAFN

My strong suit is: my ability to speak publicly

I would rather eat glass than: not be able to do what I do now

I take care of myself by: making sure I have quiet alone time.  I love to get lost in a Linda Fairstein or James Patterson novel.

It will be time to do something else when: Sexual Violence ENDS

In 10 years I would like to be:
financially independent so that I could just do public speaking

Words of advice for a struggling SANE program coordinator?  Surround yourself with supportive colleagues; don’t try to do it alone.  Network with others in your area.  Share your struggles and your successes.  If you can be there for your nurses, they will be there for you.