Dear Engaged Bystander: I love this headline because it celebrates the power of what two women can do to protect others. It is an amazing story too since two young women left the comfort of their apartment to help someone they did not know. 
 
Here is what they said in the article: " I heard a panic scream. Like a help kind of yell." "When I got to my window I saw a man on top of a young girl."   The two friends then rushed outside... to stop it.
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander, On October 25, “as many as 20 people were involved in or stood and watched the gang rape of a 15 year old girl outside a California high school homecoming dance...” 

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Dear Engaged bystander:  I just finished reading the most recent issue of Partners in Social Change (PISC) focused on “Bystanders: Agents of Primary Prevention.” What struck me about this publication by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs were the underlying values that thread through each and every one of these articles.  Values of:

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I recently read an article in the Washington Post, "Churches Grapple with Whether to Accept Convicted Sex Offenders." 
 
The article begins with the following: 
 
"All are welcome" is a common phrase on many a church sign and Web site. But what happens when a convicted sex offender is at the door?
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  The front page of the Sunday NY Times had a story titled “Rethinking Sex Offender Laws for Youths Showing Off Online.”    There is so much to say on this issue. 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I’m all for the bystander approach and it seems as if the bystander strategy has taken a firm hold in the violence prevention field. I see many merits of the approach including reducing defensiveness in our conversations with men and boys, giving tools to address and interrupt problematic behaviors and attitudes on the spectrum of violence and empowering individuals to see themselves as part of a community response to violence.   Wherever we have tried using the bystander approach there have been important shifts in our communities towards holding perpetrators acco

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Dear Engaged Bystander: So I had my 15 minutes of fame on Monday. Through the NSVRC I got a call from Harpo Productions (yes the Oprah network!) asking if I would be interested in being a guest on the Dr. Laura Berman show. She is on their radio network and well, of COURSE I would want to be on the show. It is a great show and Dr. Berman is engaging, asks good questions and her approach is supportive rather than antagonist towards her guests. I was excited, actually thrilled and flattered to be asked!
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:   Here is a great event that you can go to in person or see online.  On November 10, 2010;  from  6:00pm - 8:00 pm EST, there is a FREE Film Screening of THE LINE, a documentary by Nancy Schwartzman.  This screening will be a great event that you can see online or in person.  The

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 Dear Engaged Bystander:  For more than a year, I have focused this bystander blog on preventing sexual violence. As I complete this last blog entry, I hope to offer an equally compelling argument for us to extend bystander intervention AFTER the abuse has been perpetrated.
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: I love this campaign by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs. The message is simple, positive, and engaging. Ending Sexual Violence Takes All of Us. What will YOU do? 
 
In our advocacy work, we often talk about what not to do. It makes sense that this is our approach when we are trying to stop sexual violence. 
 

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