Dear Engaged Bystander: When I give talks, I think that the hardest concept to get across is that our current frame for decision-making is wrong. Talk with anyone who sees something that makes them uncomfortable (e.g., a man pushing against a woman breasts in a NYC subway or a neighbor taking pictures of all the young girls at the public pool) and the decision they are trying to make is “to do something or do nothing”.  I think that when we are uncomfortable, we need to decide WHAT is the best and safest thing for me to do in this situation. And there are hundreds of actions we can take in

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I read a wonderful quote recently about the importance of stories:
 
“Telling stories is as basic to human beings as eating. More so, in fact, for while food makes us live, stories are what make our lives worth living.”

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I often hear people question whether doing something (or saying something) will have any impact at all?  Maybe we have all been there... 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: When there is scientific consensus, why do people still deny science (e.g., climate change doesn’t exist, vaccines cause autism)? 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  Myth or Fact?  I always come up against people who convincingly state that the recidivism rates for ALL sex offenders is close to 90%. From all of the research I have seen, this is simply not true. And from the anecdotes I have heard, I also believe that it is just not true. So why do people deny the science about those who sexually abuse? 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: When faced with a subway flasher, woman decides she is not going to take it anymore

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Dear Engaged Bystander: Images and words speak volumes about how people think and feel about an issue. Think about when we use the word bystander --  we usually describe that person as an "Innocent Bystander". We never hear the phrase "He/she was a Guilty Bystander."  
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: I am deeply moved by the groundswell of responses from across the country to this growing bullying epidemic among teens. We can learn so much about how individuals, organizations and communities are using the horror to mobilize parents, teachers, schools, churches and others responsible for teens to take these suicides seriously and send a clear message that respect must be the bottom line. 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  The xCHANGE is a really unique opportunity to talk with Dr. Victoria Banyard, a nationally recognized expert on bystander intervention and the lead researcher of the UNH program, Bringing in the Bystander.  Here are the details:
 
The National Sexual Violence Resource Center is pleased to announce the first in a series of online forums that will focus on supporting the xCHANGE of information between advocates, prevention educators and researchers.  The forums are free and all you need to participate is a user account at nsvrc.org.
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: Yale likes to think that when they speak the world listens. In this case, the world is listening to an incredibly disturbing incident. If you have not heard, on October 13, a group of pledges from a Yale fraternity marched through a part of the Yale campus where most of the freshman women are housed chanting “No means Yes, Yes means anal!” They continued with “My name is Jack, I’m a necrophiliac, I f*ck dead women, and fill them with my semen.

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