Dear Engaged Bystander:  I have always been impressed with the ability of some states to mobilize businesses and other "unlikely partner" to get involved in prevention.  It makes sense, but it is not something I have seen happen very often when you talk about child sexual abuse or sexual assault. 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: Abraham Toure is being called a hero by local police for helping a rape victim who screamed for help. He says, he is not a hero, what he did is "just normal human behavior… I was thinking I could only imagine how scared this girl must be. I was just thinking, 'What can I do to help her?'"

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  This is Part II of my interview with Jackson Katz
 
Joan: What is your vision for creating that institutional change?
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  Alison Hall, the interim director of Pittsburg Actions Against Rape wrote a great letter to the editor about Ben Roethlisberger's birthday celebration.  If you are not familiar with the case, Ben Roethlisberger, is the quarterback for the Pittesburg Steelers.  He has been accused of raping a college student during his birthday bar crawl.  
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: Two seemingly unrelated facts about me: I am a huge fan of primary prevention. And I am a Yelp-er. I rely on the consumer-review website for guidance about the best tailor in my neighborhood to where I can unfailingly find delicious ravioli or patio dining.

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Dear Engaged bystander:  I just finished reading the most recent issue of Partners in Social Change (PISC) focused on “Bystanders: Agents of Primary Prevention.” What struck me about this publication by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs were the underlying values that thread through each and every one of these articles.  Values of:

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I recently read an article in the Washington Post, "Churches Grapple with Whether to Accept Convicted Sex Offenders." 
 
The article begins with the following: 
 
"All are welcome" is a common phrase on many a church sign and Web site. But what happens when a convicted sex offender is at the door?
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  The front page of the Sunday NY Times had a story titled “Rethinking Sex Offender Laws for Youths Showing Off Online.”    There is so much to say on this issue. 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I’m all for the bystander approach and it seems as if the bystander strategy has taken a firm hold in the violence prevention field. I see many merits of the approach including reducing defensiveness in our conversations with men and boys, giving tools to address and interrupt problematic behaviors and attitudes on the spectrum of violence and empowering individuals to see themselves as part of a community response to violence.   Wherever we have tried using the bystander approach there have been important shifts in our communities towards holding perpetrators acco

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 Dear Engaged Bystander:  For more than a year, I have focused this bystander blog on preventing sexual violence. As I complete this last blog entry, I hope to offer an equally compelling argument for us to extend bystander intervention AFTER the abuse has been perpetrated.
 

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