Dear Engaged Bystander: When I give talks, I think that the hardest concept to get across is that our current frame for decision-making is wrong. Talk with anyone who sees something that makes them uncomfortable (e.g., a man pushing against a woman breasts in a NYC subway or a neighbor taking pictures of all the young girls at the public pool) and the decision they are trying to make is “to do something or do nothing”.  I think that when we are uncomfortable, we need to decide WHAT is the best and safest thing for me to do in this situation. And there are hundreds of actions we can take in

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Dear Engaged Bystander: I am deeply moved by the groundswell of responses from across the country to this growing bullying epidemic among teens. We can learn so much about how individuals, organizations and communities are using the horror to mobilize parents, teachers, schools, churches and others responsible for teens to take these suicides seriously and send a clear message that respect must be the bottom line. 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: Yale likes to think that when they speak the world listens. In this case, the world is listening to an incredibly disturbing incident. If you have not heard, on October 13, a group of pledges from a Yale fraternity marched through a part of the Yale campus where most of the freshman women are housed chanting “No means Yes, Yes means anal!” They continued with “My name is Jack, I’m a necrophiliac, I f*ck dead women, and fill them with my semen.

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Dear Engaged Bystander:  I have worked for years in the field of sexual violence prevention with a focus on stopping the perpetration of child sexual abuse.  So when I read about this new campaign in the blog "Feministing", I just loved her opening line: 

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