We are close to having our next bulletin on writing business plans available, so in anticipation of said forthcoming bulletin, I want to talk briefly about planning in general. Planning is not something into which I've seen many SANE programs put a lot of time and effort, except when forced to do so by a third party, like a potential funder during the grant writing process. I think sometimes we write planning off as a luxury we can't afford, or we just don't think it's necessary for the everyday business of caring for our patients.

Undefined

Generating media coverage isn't a skill many people running SANE programs possess. Let's face it--we don't get an opportunity to hone this particular skill set with any regularity. And yet being able to draw attention to our programs, staff and services allows our communities to better get to know us. The more our communities know (and value) our work, the more integral our services become to their infrastructure. It becomes easier to recruit new staff, cultivate potential donors and establish relationships that can benefit our programs and patients.
 

Undefined

This Friday's Q&A comes to us from Shalotta Sharp in Cuba, AL. I met Shalotta, as I meet so many people, through IAFN, in Salt Lake City. It's really one of the best reasons to get yourself to the Assembly, that whole networking thing. I'm so glad she agreed to be the focus of this week's Q&A, as I attempt to highlight practice from all over the country. Thanks, Shalotta!
 

Undefined

For those of you who will be attending the IAFN Annual Scientific Assembly, please note that we will be doing a full-day workshop on Saturday, October 24th for program managers (for some reason, they titled it NSVRC Leadership, which doesn't provide much info). The goal of the workshop is to provide program managers with tools and resources to more efficiently and effectively run sustainable clinical programs.

Undefined

I am thrilled to announce that our 1st bulletin from the Sustainability project has just been released.

Undefined

Anthony Tjan has a great post today about keeping employees happy. It's something we talk about all the time, since we know people aren't always paid what they deserve, and we know the hours people give to call are often ridiculous. And yet, there are some programs that have very little turnover, and it's not necessarily because they have more money than everyone else.
 

Undefined

It's always nice to see the work we do get some good press, particularly in a national publication. Check out this article from last week's USA Today, including IAFN President & project consultant Jennifer Pierce-Weeks. Fantastic!

Undefined

I have been fortunate to work with Linda Rossman on and off for many years. And I'm truly lucky she works with me on the sustainability project as one of our consultants. She's been doing this work for some time now, out of a community-based clinic in Michigan. But I'll let her explain all that to you:
 
I’ve been a SANE since:  1996

Hospital or community-based program? Community Based: YWCA West Central Michigan Nurse Examiner Program

Undefined

I often find articles about recruiting and retaining nurses to be irrelevant to our work, because they generally miss the major issues we face. However, I just read an article from Hospital & Health Networks, and I think it makes some excellent points. I especially like their 9 Principles to Foster Staff Retention:
 

Undefined

I have learned that the most effective leaders are those who believe in their own leadership. And not just in their ability to lead, but also in their right to be that person leading others. Which is why program coordinator and leader are not necessarily synonymous. There are a lot of SANE programs that have coordination but no leadership. But even in cases where you find yourself in a coordinator role you never asked for, developing and honing leadership skills is critical for program sustainability.
 

Undefined

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs